Acoustic Doppler Velocimetry (ADV) in the Field and in Laboratory: Practical Experiences

Chanson, Hubert (2008). Acoustic Doppler Velocimetry (ADV) in the Field and in Laboratory: Practical Experiences. In: Frédérique Larrarte and Hubert Chanson, Experiences and Challenges in Sewers: Measurements and Hydrodynamics. International Meeting on Measurements and Hydraulics of Sewers IMMHS'08, Summer School GEMCEA/LCPC, Bouguenais, France, (49-66). 19-21 August 2008.

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Author Chanson, Hubert
Title of paper Acoustic Doppler Velocimetry (ADV) in the Field and in Laboratory: Practical Experiences
Conference name International Meeting on Measurements and Hydraulics of Sewers IMMHS'08, Summer School GEMCEA/LCPC
Conference location Bouguenais, France
Conference dates 19-21 August 2008
Convener Frédérique Larrarte
Proceedings title Experiences and Challenges in Sewers: Measurements and Hydrodynamics
Place of Publication Brisban, Australia
Publisher Department of Civil Engineering at The University of Queensland
Publication Year 2008
Year available 2008
Sub-type Fully published paper
ISBN 9781864999280
Editor Frédérique Larrarte
Hubert Chanson
Start page 49
End page 66
Total pages 18
Collection year 2008
Language eng
Abstract/Summary In many waterways and estuaries, a basic understanding of turbulent mixing is critical to the knowledge of sediment transport and predictions of contaminant dispersion and water quality. These flows are turbulent and velocity measurements must be conducted at high frequency to resolve the small eddies and the viscous dissipation process. The acoustic Doppler velocimetry (ADV) is designed to record instantaneous velocity components at a single-point with such a relatively high frequency. The ADV signal strength may provide further information on the instantaneous suspended sediment concentration (SSC). Laboratory and field experiences demonstrated that the ADV metrology is a robust technique well-suited to steady and unsteady turbulence measurements in open channel flows. But the ADV outputs must be processed carefully while the calibration of an ADV for SSC measurements is critical. Laboratory and field experiments with turbulence measurements in open channels are discussed herein. Past experiences showed unequivocally that turbulence properties should not be derived from unprocessed ADV signals and that even classical "despiking" methods were not directly applicable to many field and laboratory applications. A successful data analysis relies often upon solid practical experiences with the instrumentation, its capabilities and its limitations.
Subjects 290000 Engineering and Technology
290800 Civil Engineering
290802 Water and Sanitary Engineering
291800 Interdisciplinary Engineering
291803 Turbulent Flows
299900 Other Engineering and Technology
299904 Engineering/Technology Instrumentation
Keyword Turbulence
acoustic Doppler velocimetry (ADV)
metrology
instrumentation
physical experiments
field measurements
practical experiences
suspended sediment concentration SSC
Q-Index Code EX
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Additional Notes The full bibliographic details are : CHANSON, H. (2008). "Acoustic Doppler Velocimetry (ADV) in the Field and in Laboratory: Practical Experiences." Proceedings of the International Meeting on Measurements and Hydraulics of Sewers IMMHS'08, Summer School GEMCEA/LCPC, 19-21 Aug. 2008, Bouguenais, Frédérique LARRARTE and Hubert CHANSON Eds., Hydraulic Model Report No. CH70/08, Div. of Civil Engineering, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia, Dec., pp. 49-66 (ISBN 9781864999280).

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Civil Engineering Publications
 
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Created: Fri, 28 Nov 2008, 14:58:54 EST by Hubert Chanson on behalf of School of Civil Engineering