Allometric scaling of maximum metabolic rate: the influence of temperature

White, C. R., Terblanche, J. S., Kabat, A. P., Blackburn, T. M., Chown, S. L. and Butler, P. J. (2008) Allometric scaling of maximum metabolic rate: the influence of temperature. Functional Ecology, 22 4: 616-623.


Author White, C. R.
Terblanche, J. S.
Kabat, A. P.
Blackburn, T. M.
Chown, S. L.
Butler, P. J.
Title Allometric scaling of maximum metabolic rate: the influence of temperature
Journal name Functional Ecology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0269-8463
Publication date 2008-08
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1365-2435.2008.01399.x
Volume 22
Issue 4
Start page 616
End page 623
Total pages 8
Place of publication United Kingdom
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd
Collection year 2009
Language eng
Subject C1
060604 Comparative Physiology
970106 Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
0602 Ecology
Abstract # Maximum aerobic metabolic rate, measured in terms of rate of oxygen consumption during exercise ( ), is well known to scale to body mass (M) with an exponent greater than the value of 0·75 predicted by models based on the geometry of systems that supply nutrients. # 2. Recently, the observed scaling for (∝M0·872) has been hypothesized to arise because of the temperature dependence of biological processes, and because large species show a greater increase in muscle temperature when exercising than do small species. # 3. Based on this hypothesis, we predicted that will be positively related to ambient temperature, because heat loss is restricted at high temperatures and body temperature is likely to be elevated to a greater extent than during exercise in the cold. # 4. This prediction was tested using a comparative phylogenetic generalized least-squares (PGLS) approach, and 34 measurements of six species of rodent (20·5–939 g) maximally exercising at temperatures from –16 to 30 °C. # 5. is unrelated to testing temperature, but is negatively related to acclimation temperature. We conclude that prolonged cold exposure increases exercise-induced by acting as a form of aerobic training in mammals, and that elevated muscle temperatures of large species do not explain the scaling of across taxa.
Formatted abstract #

Maximum aerobic metabolic rate, measured in terms of rate of oxygen consumption during exercise ( ), is well known to scale to body mass (M) with an exponent greater than the value of 0·75 predicted by models based on the geometry of systems that supply nutrients.
# 2.

Recently, the observed scaling for (∝M0·872) has been hypothesized to arise because of the temperature dependence of biological processes, and because large species show a greater increase in muscle temperature when exercising than do small species.
# 3.

Based on this hypothesis, we predicted that will be positively related to ambient temperature, because heat loss is restricted at high temperatures and body temperature is likely to be elevated to a greater extent than during exercise in the cold.
# 4.

This prediction was tested using a comparative phylogenetic generalized least-squares (PGLS) approach, and 34 measurements of six species of rodent (20·5–939 g) maximally exercising at temperatures from –16 to 30 °C.
# 5.

is unrelated to testing temperature, but is negatively related to acclimation temperature. We conclude that prolonged cold exposure increases exercise-induced by acting as a form of aerobic training in mammals, and that elevated muscle temperatures of large species do not explain the scaling of across taxa.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2009 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 27 Nov 2008, 17:52:46 EST by Gail Walter on behalf of School of Biological Sciences