Use of tick antitoxin serum (TAS) and associated drug therapies for the management of Ixodes holocyclus toxicity in dogs

Mr Daniel Schull (2008). Use of tick antitoxin serum (TAS) and associated drug therapies for the management of Ixodes holocyclus toxicity in dogs PhD Thesis, School of Veterinary Science, The University of Queensland.

       
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n33309260_PHD_abstract.pdf Final Thesis ABSTRACT Lodgement application/pdf 6.08KB 20
n33309260_PHD_totalthesis.pdf Final Thesis Lodgement application/pdf 3.45MB 41
Author Mr Daniel Schull
Thesis Title Use of tick antitoxin serum (TAS) and associated drug therapies for the management of Ixodes holocyclus toxicity in dogs
School, Centre or Institute School of Veterinary Science
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2008-05
Thesis type PhD Thesis
Supervisor Professor Rick Atwell
Dr Caroline O'Leary
Total pages 242
Total colour pages 12
Total black and white pages 230
Subjects 300000 Agricultural, Veterinary and Environmental Sciences
Formatted abstract The objective of this thesis was to enhance the way tick antitoxin serum (TAS) and associated
drug therapies are used in the management of Ixodes holocyclus toxicity in dogs. A review of
current literature; a cross-sectional retrospective survey and a series of five prospective
randomised placebo-controlled clinical studies were performed. The following results were
generated: (1) a synopsis describing how TAS and associated drug therapies are currently
used for the management of tick toxicity in dogs by clinicians in practice; (2) the perceptions
of clinicians regarding the nature of acute side effects associated with TAS administration in
dogs with tick toxicity; (3) clinical characterisation of acute side effects associated with the
administration of TAS in healthy conscious dogs when given according to currently accepted
techniques; (4) evidence regarding the aetiology of acute side effects associated with the
administration of TAS in dogs; (5) clinical characterisation of the cardiovascular effects of
ancillary drug therapies including TAS premedicants when given according to current
recommendations; (6) the efficacy of recommended premedicants in the prevention of acute
side effects associated with the administration of TAS in healthy conscious dogs; and (7)
practical recommendations for the use of TAS and associated drug therapies for the
management of tick toxicity in dogs. This thesis generates important new information
concerning the use of TAS and associated drug therapies for the management of tick toxicity
in dogs. Findings from this thesis will improve the way dogs with tick toxicity are managed by
veterinary clinicians and have highlighted future research directions in this previously
unexplored area.
Additional Notes Colour pages - Page numbers 55, 78, 79, 80, 114, 137, 139, 142, 165, 166, 167, 195

 
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Created: Sat, 25 Oct 2008, 16:10:49 EST by Mr Daniel Schull on behalf of School of Veterinary Science