Men and manliness on the frontier: Queensland and British Columbia in the mid-nineteenth century

Hogg, Robert Paul (2007). Men and manliness on the frontier: Queensland and British Columbia in the mid-nineteenth century PhD Thesis, School of History, Philosophy, Religion, and Classics, University of Queensland.

       
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Author Hogg, Robert Paul
Thesis Title Men and manliness on the frontier: Queensland and British Columbia in the mid-nineteenth century
School, Centre or Institute School of History, Philosophy, Religion, and Classics
Institution University of Queensland
Publication date 2007
Thesis type PhD Thesis
Supervisor Martin Crotty
Total pages 317
Collection year 2007
Language eng
Subjects 2103 Historical Studies
Formatted abstract In mid-nineteenth century Britain there existed a dominant masculine ethos denoted by the term ‘manliness’. ‘Manliness’ encompassed the virtues of courage, stoicism, endurance, self-control, temperance, honesty and integrity. Above all the possession of ‘character’ and the achievement of ‘independence’ were regarded as the primary attributes of a man. While the ‘gentleman’ supposedly embodied all the manly virtues, the ethos of manliness pervaded all classes, although it was not necessarily uniformly practised. Britain’s imperial venture saw thousands of men of all classes leave Britain for colonies such as Queensland and British Columbia. British men imagined these frontiers as sites for the performance of manliness and the achievement of manly independence. Indeed, many men found ample opportunity for the exercise of courage, perseverance and stoicism. However, the performance of manliness on the frontier was problematic. Though zealously performed by many, the manly ideal was not successfully practised by all. Some aspects of the ideal – sobriety, sexual propriety, and the fulfillment of family responsibilities – were put under stress by frontier. Despite the pervasiveness of a well-defined and articulated ethos of manliness, the actuality was quite different. In practice, there was no absolute standard, no hard and fast line between manliness and unmanliness. The manly ethos was a driver on the frontier, influencing actions and determining responses to frontier conditions. The doctrine of manliness was discursively employed to marginalise and subordinate indigenous peoples and violence against indigenous people was often regarded as an expression of manly virtue.
Keyword Frontier and pioneer life -- British Columbia -- History -- 19th century
Frontier and pioneer life -- Queensland -- History -- 19th century
Pioneers -- British Columbia -- History -- 19th century
Pioneers -- Queensland -- History -- 19th century
Masculinity -- Great Britain -- History -- 19th century
Masculinity -- British Columbia -- History -- 19th century
Masculinity -- Queensland -- History -- 19th century
Additional Notes The author has given permission for this thesis to be made open access.

 
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Created: Fri, 21 Nov 2008, 16:37:35 EST