An Investigation of the Impact of Physical Education on the Attitudes and Exercise Behaviour of Lower Secondary School Students in Chiang Rai, Thailand

Lekkla, Phitak (2006). An Investigation of the Impact of Physical Education on the Attitudes and Exercise Behaviour of Lower Secondary School Students in Chiang Rai, Thailand PhD Thesis, School of Education, University of Queensland.

       
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Author Lekkla, Phitak
Thesis Title An Investigation of the Impact of Physical Education on the Attitudes and Exercise Behaviour of Lower Secondary School Students in Chiang Rai, Thailand
School, Centre or Institute School of Education
Institution University of Queensland
Publication date 2006
Thesis type PhD Thesis
Supervisor Anne Jobling
Abstract/Summary The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of physical education on the attitudes and exercise behaviour of lower secondary students in Chiang Rai province, Thailand. This study was designed in two phases of investigation. First, a quantitative study was undertaken using a questionnaire given to 500 students designed by the researcher that aimed to ascertain the attitudes toward exercise, exercise behaviours and problems in doing exercise. The aim of the study was to provide preliminary data on the likely aspects of the impact of physical education curriculum on the students’ lives. The second phase of the investigation was a qualitative study using an in depth semi-structured interview of 30 active and 30 inactive students selected on the basis of their responses in the first phase. Ten physical education teachers and five school administrators across the range of schools in the investigation were also interviewed. This phase aimed to examine the effectiveness of physical education teaching and learning especially with the implementation of the new PE curriculum. Data from Phase 1 were analysed using a Statistical Packages for Social Sciences for Windows (SPSS for Windows). The second phase was analyzed descriptively from transcriptions of the audio-tapes of the interviews and from these themes and category responses were developed. Inter-rater reliability was obtained. The findings from Phase 1 showed that students thought that PE provided in school was worthwhile for their life. Most students reported that they have positive attitude towards exercise and believed that exercise had health benefits. Also, in Phase 2 most students both active and inactive agreed that PE activities learnt from classes could help them to have knowledge and skills for a healthy lifestyle after they finish school. However, the most salient finding concerned students’ knowledge about the basic principles of exercise such as warming up, cooling down, duration and frequency of exercise for health. It is necessary to provide these content on physical education curriculum to fill these gaps. Three major factors influenced students’ exercise behaviour. First, students’ interests and motivation to exercise. Most of them exercised to have fun, have friends and becauses it was good for their health. Second, the content of PE curriculum provided in PE classes influenced their exercise behaviour. The majority of active students reported that they preferred sport as the first priority. In contrast, inactive students preferred recreation but sports would be their last choice. The last factor was perceived barriers to exercise. Generally, students did not have many barriers to exercise. However, poor sports skills and having to help their parents to do household chores were the major barriers for some students especially for inactive students.

 
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Created: Fri, 21 Nov 2008, 15:46:03 EST