Neurocognitive and neuroimaging evidence of behavioural dysregulation in human drug addiction: Implications for diagnosis, treatment and prevention

Yucel, Murat and Lubman, Dan I. (2007) Neurocognitive and neuroimaging evidence of behavioural dysregulation in human drug addiction: Implications for diagnosis, treatment and prevention. Drug and Alcohol Review, 26 1: 33-39. doi:10.1080/09595230601036978


Author Yucel, Murat
Lubman, Dan I.
Title Neurocognitive and neuroimaging evidence of behavioural dysregulation in human drug addiction: Implications for diagnosis, treatment and prevention
Journal name Drug and Alcohol Review   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1465-3362
0959-5236
Publication date 2007-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/09595230601036978
Volume 26
Issue 1
Start page 33
End page 39
Total pages 4
Place of publication Richmond, VIC, Australia
Publisher Blackwell Publishign Asia
Language eng
Subject 1117 Public Health and Health Services
1701 Psychology
Abstract Neuropsychological and neuroimaging studies have generated a wealth of data demonstrating structural and functional brain changes, as well as cognitive deficits in drug addicted populations. Despite this, it is often difficult to make generalisations or conclusive statements about the neuropsychological and neurobiological correlates of chronic drug use given variations in the nature or extent of deficits observed within or across different classes of drugs. In this review, we focus specifically on the evidence for impairments in prefrontally-mediated cognitive functions that underlie behavioural regulation, namely decision making and inhibitory control. We argue that impairments in these specific domains, which are often compounded by an earlier initiation of drug use, polydrug abuse, comorbid psychiatric conditions, previous head injury, and acute withdrawal effects can serve to increase the risk for making decisions that are impulsive, focussed on short-terms gains and lack inhibitory control. We further argue that these impairments of prefrontal functioning may underpin the compulsive and 'loss-of-control' pattern of drug-seeking and drug-taking that is characteristic of drug addiction. Finally, we consider the implications of these findings for diagnosis, treatment and prevention, suggesting that a comprehensive understanding of the nature and extent of these cognitive deficits should form a core part of the conceptualization and focus of effective treatment.
Keyword Cognition Disorders/*chemically
induced/diagnosis/physiopathology/psychology
Comorbidity
Decision Making/drug effects/physiology
Gyrus Cinguli/drug effects/physiopathology
Humans
Inhibition (Psychology)
*Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Mental Disorders/*chemically induced/diagnosis/physiopathology/psychology
*Neuropsychological Tests
Neurotoxicity Syndromes/diagnosis/*physiopathology/psychology
Prefrontal Cortex/drug effects/physiopathology
Street Drugs/*toxicity
Substance-Related Disorders/diagnosis/*physiopathology/psychology
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Public Health Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 28 Aug 2008, 18:16:20 EST