Elevated serum prostate-specific antigen levels and public health implications in three New Zealand ethnic groups: European, Maori, and Pacific Island men

Gray, Marion, Borman, Barry, Crampton, Peter, Weinstein, Philip, Wright, Craig and Nacey, John (2005) Elevated serum prostate-specific antigen levels and public health implications in three New Zealand ethnic groups: European, Maori, and Pacific Island men. New Zealand Medical Journal, 118 1209: 1-15.

Author Gray, Marion
Borman, Barry
Crampton, Peter
Weinstein, Philip
Wright, Craig
Nacey, John
Title Elevated serum prostate-specific antigen levels and public health implications in three New Zealand ethnic groups: European, Maori, and Pacific Island men
Journal name New Zealand Medical Journal   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1175-8716
Publication date 2005-02-11
Sub-type Article (original research)
Volume 118
Issue 1209
Start page 1
End page 15
Total pages 15
Place of publication Christchurch, New Zealand
Publisher New Zealand Medical Association
Language eng
Subject 1117 Public Health and Health Services
Formatted abstract
Aims
To predict differences in prostate cancer rates between New Zealand's major ethnic groups using community-based levels of elevated serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA).

Methods
This study was undertaken in the Wellington region of New Zealand. 1425 subjects with no clinical history of prostate cancer had serum PSA levels measured—728 New Zealand European, 353 Maori, and 344 Pacific Island men. Age-standardised elevated PSA prevalences were calculated by standardising for population proportions. Prostate cancer prevalence ratios were predicted using a previously published method.

Results
There was no significant difference between New Zealand’s ethnic groups in the prevalence of elevated PSA (p>0.05). The overall age-standardised elevated PSA prevalence (3.9%) was lower than for all other community-based studies that were compared. Predicted cancer prevalence ratios were 1.1 across all New Zealand ethnic comparisons.

Conclusions
The prevalence of elevated PSA in New Zealand men is lower than found in other community-based studies, and not significantly different between the three New Zealand ethnic groups. However, levels of elevated PSA may be useful for predicting prostate cancer incidence rates in ethnic groups. Available incidence data show New Zealand European men to have a higher prostate cancer incidence rate than both Maori and Pacific Islands men; however, this study found that prostate cancer incidence ratios between these groups are more likely to be closer to 1. Findings may indicate cultural barriers in the health system for Maori and Pacific Islands men; highlighting the need for clinicians to further consider cultural appropriateness in practice, and to target prostate health promotion for these groups.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
ERA 2012 Admin Only
School of Public Health Publications
 
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Created: Fri, 29 Aug 2008, 03:40:55 EST