When I get my paper: Migration, Survival and Relationships of Fijians and Fiji Indians in Griffith, New South Wales.

Mark Schubert (2008). When I get my paper: Migration, Survival and Relationships of Fijians and Fiji Indians in Griffith, New South Wales. PhD Thesis, School of Social Science, The University of Queensland.

       
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n40584618_phd_abstract.pdf n40584618_phd_abstract.pdf application/pdf 13.49MB 6
n40584618_phd_content.pdf n40584618_phd_content.pdf application/pdf 13.48MB 1
n40584618_phd_front.pdf n40584618_phd_front.pdf application/pdf 13.49MB 15
n40584618_phd_totalthesis.pdf n40584618_phd_totalthesis.pdf application/pdf 13.47MB 4
Author Mark Schubert
Thesis Title When I get my paper: Migration, Survival and Relationships of Fijians and Fiji Indians in Griffith, New South Wales.
School, Centre or Institute School of Social Science
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2008-04
Thesis type PhD Thesis
Supervisor Johnson, Helen
Skrbis, Zlatko
Subjects 370000 Studies in Human Society
Formatted abstract This thesis contributes to the anthropology of migrant undocumentedness and removal, an emerging discursive field which asserts that the lives of undocumented migrants and those at risk of removal follow the life and social contours the receiving government and society allows them.
This ethnographic study of undocumented and documented Fiji Indian and Fijian migrants in Griffith, a township in rural New South Wales, Australia, however, demonstrates the strategies that the undocumented with the documented can and do use to widen their life and social choices, regardless of the strategies the Australian nation-state uses to fit them (back) into and out of its image of society.
It argues that social structures and personal agencies do not act as ethnically prejudiced pushers and pullers of Fiji Indians and Fijians into migration. However, once Fiji Indians and Fijians have migrated to Australia and are faced with negotiation of the Australian nation-state’s increasingly exclusionary boundaries and Australian society’s social and economic ones, both groups rely on adequately isolated physical spaces in which to move in order to mark out their own smaller spaces to (largely) recreate, align with and adhere to social structures. Their sets of habitus, practice and structures from their respective societies in Fiji are reproduced and adapted, in the case of Fiji Indians, to enable isolation from each other and in the case of Fijians, to enable close, intensive, kinship and sociality with each other.


 
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Created: Thu, 21 Aug 2008, 14:06:01 EST by Noela Stallard on behalf of Library - Information Access Service