Season of birth effect and latitude: a systematic review and meta-analysis of Northern Hemisphere studies

Davies, G., Welham, J., Torrey, E. F. and McGrath, J. J. (2000). Season of birth effect and latitude: a systematic review and meta-analysis of Northern Hemisphere studies. In: L. E. DeLisl, Schizophrenia Research: Abstracts of Tenth Biennial Winter Workshop on Schizophrenia - Special Issue. Tenth Biennial Winter Workshop on Schizophrenia, Davos, Switzerland, (62-62). 5-11 February, 2000. doi:10.1016/S0920-9964(00)90437-7


Author Davies, G.
Welham, J.
Torrey, E. F.
McGrath, J. J.
Title of paper Season of birth effect and latitude: a systematic review and meta-analysis of Northern Hemisphere studies
Conference name Tenth Biennial Winter Workshop on Schizophrenia
Conference location Davos, Switzerland
Conference dates 5-11 February, 2000
Proceedings title Schizophrenia Research: Abstracts of Tenth Biennial Winter Workshop on Schizophrenia - Special Issue   Check publisher's open access policy
Journal name Schizophrenia Research   Check publisher's open access policy
Place of Publication Amsterdam
Publisher Elsevier Science
Publication Year 2000
DOI 10.1016/S0920-9964(00)90437-7
ISSN 0920-9964
Editor L. E. DeLisl
Volume 41
Issue 1
Start page 62
End page 62
Total pages 1
Language eng
Abstract/Summary The aim of this review was to exmaine if latitude was associated with the magnitude of this seasonal effect in the northern hemisphere. Based on the hypothesis that low prenatal vitamin D is a risk modifying factor for schizophrenia, we hypothesised that higher latitudes would be associated with greater seasonal effect. We undertook a systematic search for all publications related to seasonality in schizophrenia in the northern hemisphere. Inclusion criteria included: ( 1 ) the schizophrenia and general population groups were drawn from the identical time periods and catchment areas; (2) the publication contained data which allowed comparison of winter/spring births versus autumn/summer births. An exact or mean latitude value was given to each site. Data for 62,934 subjects drawn from 20 sites were available. A significant positive correlation was found between the odds ratio for the season of birth comparison and latitude (r=0.48, p=0.03). For the rectaanalysis, we divided the sample into three latitude bands each with roughly equal number of subjects (sample size tertiles).
Subjects E3
111714 Mental Health
Q-Index Code E3

Document type: Conference Paper
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Created: Sat, 07 Jun 2008, 00:31:12 EST