Don't drink the water and don't eat the food: Master of Public Health students prepare to undertake group fieldwork projects overseas

Paterson, J. H., Rouse, K. E. and Bryan, J. H. (2000). Don't drink the water and don't eat the food: Master of Public Health students prepare to undertake group fieldwork projects overseas. In: Effective Teaching and Learning at University: Effective Teaching Conference. Effective Teaching and Learning Conference 2000, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia, (1-10). 9 - 10 November 2000.


Author Paterson, J. H.
Rouse, K. E.
Bryan, J. H.
Title of paper Don't drink the water and don't eat the food: Master of Public Health students prepare to undertake group fieldwork projects overseas
Conference name Effective Teaching and Learning Conference 2000
Conference location The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia
Conference dates 9 - 10 November 2000
Convener Teaching and Educational Development Institute (TEDI)
Proceedings title Effective Teaching and Learning at University: Effective Teaching Conference
Place of Publication Brisbane, Australia
Publisher TEDI (Teaching & Educational Development Institute), University of Queensland
Publication Year 2000
Sub-type Fully published paper
Start page 1
End page 10
Total pages 10
Collection year 2000
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
Since the Master of Community Nutrition (MCN) began in 1979, around 300 students from 20 countries have graduated. The Master of Tropical Health (MTH) Course began in 1987, and around 200 students from 35 countries have graduated. The MCN and MTH courses are now closely integrated and known as the Master of Public Health (MPH) (Community Nutrition or Tropical Health). The masters program consists of two semesters of coursework in Brisbane and one semester of fieldwork overseas where the knowledge and skills learned in Australia are applied in context. The culminating experience of group fieldwork undertaken overseas is a unique feature of this MPH program.

'Fieldwork Preparation' involves preparing groups of students from a variety of nationalities for a research project in a county other than their own. Issues such as project design, research methodology, sampling, ethics, and risk assessment, as well as group dynamics and the challenge of working in another culture and language are considered. Assessable outcomes include an individual literature review and a group seminar presentation of the research proposal.

This paper outlines some of the lessons learned from the fieldwork preparation process for a diverse group of students. The reality of preparation within the classroom for the research experience beyond the classroom and beyond Australian shores is examined.
Subjects E2
321299 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
730299 Public health not elsewhere classified
Q-Index Code E2

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Public Health Publications
 
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Created: Fri, 06 Jun 2008, 13:29:42 EST