*TARDIS: Teaching archaeological research discipline in simulation

Hall, Jay, O'Connor, Sue, Prangnell, Jon M. and Smith, Jim (2000). *TARDIS: Teaching archaeological research discipline in simulation. In: Effective Teaching and Learning at University: Effective Teaching Conference. Effective Teaching and Learning Conference 2000, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia, (). 9 - 10 November 2000.


Author Hall, Jay
O'Connor, Sue
Prangnell, Jon M.
Smith, Jim
Title of paper *TARDIS: Teaching archaeological research discipline in simulation
Conference name Effective Teaching and Learning Conference 2000
Conference location The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia
Conference dates 9 - 10 November 2000
Convener Teaching and Educational Development Institute (TEDI)
Proceedings title Effective Teaching and Learning at University: Effective Teaching Conference
Place of Publication Brisbane, Australia
Publisher TEDI (Teaching & Educational Development Institute), University of Queensland
Publication Year 2000
Sub-type Fully published paper
Total pages 9
Collection year 2000
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
In the 1980s Dr. Jay Hall introduced the first Australian field-based undergraduate course in archaeological research discipline. For 10 years it served the needs of the 10-12 third-year students who enrolled each year, producing some internationally recognized field archaeologists. However, the course required attention at several levels, suffering from pedagogical, ethical, pragmatic, logistical and equity issues. In response, Dr Hall successfully sought funding for the development of his concept of a simulated archaeological site and enlisted the assistance of a team of specialists who designed and operationalized the TARDIS in 1995. In 2000 the Field Archaeology course has over 40 students enrolled in two separate cohorts and, far from reaching its anticipated conclusion, the site continues as a rich learning environment. This poster illustrates the three relevant phases: TARDIS production, excavation, and evaluation. While field archaeology has always required learning in context, the TARDIS demonstrates a successful solution to the complex barriers to delivery of this kind of experiential learning to undergraduates (beyond the classroom). It also facilitates greater equity in assessment. Another positive outcome was collaboration between staff and students across sub-disciplines.
Subjects E2
430207 Archaeological Science
780199 Other
Q-Index Code E2

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Social Science Publications
 
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Created: Fri, 06 Jun 2008, 13:09:28 EST