'Franklins of the Cape': The South African Commercial Advertiser and the creation of a colonial public sphere, 1824-1854

McKenzie, Kirsten (1998) 'Franklins of the Cape': The South African Commercial Advertiser and the creation of a colonial public sphere, 1824-1854. Kronos: Southern African Histories, 25 88-102. doi:10.2307/41056429

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Author McKenzie, Kirsten
Title 'Franklins of the Cape': The South African Commercial Advertiser and the creation of a colonial public sphere, 1824-1854
Formatted title
‘Franklins of the Cape’: The South African Commercial Advertiser and the creation of a colonial public sphere, 1824-1854
Journal name Kronos: Southern African Histories   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0259-0190
2309-9585
Publication date 1998
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.2307/41056429
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 25
Start page 88
End page 102
Total pages 15
Place of publication Bellville, South Africa
Publisher History Department, University of the Western Cape
Language eng
Subject C1
430106 History - African
780199 Other
Formatted abstract
From the 1820s onwards, a new political culture was gaining ground in both Britain and the colonies. Associated with economic transformations and the rise of the middle class to political power, it can be designated by the term 'bourgeois public sphere'. The press was intimately connected in both practical and symbolic ways with this new vision of political power. While expressed in the language of universality, the bourgeois public sphere was also inherently exclusionary. This paper discusses the nature of this political culture as it was elaborated at the Cape and particularly as it was expressed within the pages of the 'South African Commercial Advertiser', which started in 1824. It shows that the Cape Constitution of 1853 was based upon a definition of the public which the 'Advertiser' had put forward during the previous three decades, namely, a definition centred on the rights of rational propertied men. The 'Advertiser''s public sphere excluded women and the black underclass. The free press saw the beginning of the end of an autocratic 'ancient regime style' of goverment, but it saw 'rational men' as the inheritors of this new earth. Its racial aspect might be more subtly articulated - especially in the early decades - but it was nevertheless increasingly present...
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Social Science Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 10 Jun 2008, 15:29:37 EST