Research and a professional development programme on teaching learning strategies as part of course content

Chalmers, Denise and Fuller, Richard (1999) Research and a professional development programme on teaching learning strategies as part of course content. International Journal for Academic Development, 4 1: 28-33. doi:10.1080/1360144990040105


Author Chalmers, Denise
Fuller, Richard
Title Research and a professional development programme on teaching learning strategies as part of course content
Journal name International Journal for Academic Development   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1360-144X
1470-1324
Publication date 1999-05-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/1360144990040105
Volume 4
Issue 1
Start page 28
End page 33
Total pages 6
Editor D. Blaume
C. Knapper
P. Weeks
Place of publication London, U.K
Publisher Routledge
Collection year 1999
Language eng
Subject C1
330100 Education Studies
740301 Higher education
Formatted abstract
There is evidence that many students leave university without effective learning strategies and skills that would facilitate their learning in the future. For example, they can complete their university courses without developing information skills or a love of learning, with only a limited repertoire of learning strategies, and with no intention of engaging in further learning. While these findings indicate a need for universities to review the structure of courses and the way that they are taught and assessed, it is not necessary to wait for this to happen. Within existing course structures, universities can help prepare students for lifelong learning by teaching them learning strategies. This is best done if the strategies are taught by university teachers in the context of their regular coursework. We have confirmed in our research and professional development projects that this can be done. In an experimental study, we investigated the effects of explicitly teaching students learning strategies in the context of their regular coursework. This research indicated that students who were taught learning strategies in the context of their regular coursework used them effectively and achieved better results than students who were taught in the conventional way. In a professional development project, we taught university teachers from a variety of subject areas to teach learning strategies to students in their own courses. These teachers were successful in helping students develop a repertoire of effective learning strategies and display greater commitment to their learning.

Q-Index Code C1

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: Institute for Teaching and Learning Innovation Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 11 Jun 2008, 01:05:54 EST