Reproductive capability of brushtail possums (Trichosurus vulpecula) transferred from the wilds of Brisbane, Adelaide and Armidale into captivity in Brisbane

Baker, Michelle L. and Gemmell, Robert T. (1999) Reproductive capability of brushtail possums (Trichosurus vulpecula) transferred from the wilds of Brisbane, Adelaide and Armidale into captivity in Brisbane. Journal of Experimental Zoology, 284 7: 783-788. doi:10.1002/(SICI)1097-010X(19991201)284:7<783::AID-JEZ8>3.3.CO;2-3


Author Baker, Michelle L.
Gemmell, Robert T.
Title Reproductive capability of brushtail possums (Trichosurus vulpecula) transferred from the wilds of Brisbane, Adelaide and Armidale into captivity in Brisbane
Formatted title
Reproductive capability of brushtail possums (Trichosurus vulpecula) transferred from the wilds of Brisbane, Adelaide, and Armidale into captivity in Brisbane
Journal name Journal of Experimental Zoology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0022-104X
1097-010X
Publication date 1999-12-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1002/(SICI)1097-010X(19991201)284:7<783::AID-JEZ8>3.3.CO;2-3
Volume 284
Issue 7
Start page 783
End page 788
Total pages 6
Place of publication New York, NY, U.S.A.
Publisher Wiley-Liss
Collection year 1999
Language eng
Subject C1
270604 Comparative Physiology
780105 Biological sciences
Formatted abstract
The transfer of animals from the wild into captivity is an important strategy for the conservation of species that are under threat of extinction. To determine the reproductive capability of animals following transfer from the wild, brushtail possums relocated from Brisbane, Adelaide, and Armidale into captivity in Brisbane were monitored. Seventy five percent of the Brisbane possums (N = 80) gave birth during the months from March to May following transfer from the suburbs of Brisbane and 75% of the young born reached weaning. Thirteen adult females and four adult male brushtail possums were relocated from Adelaide into captivity in Brisbane in June 1994. Four young were born in Brisbane, however none survived to weaning and all the relocated possums had died 2 years after their transfer from Adelaide. Seventeen adult females and seven adult male possums were transferred from Armidale to Brisbane in July 1996. In the first year, 1997, four young were born in Brisbane and none survived to weaning. In the second year, three young were born and survived to weaning. Two years after their transfer, one adult male and three adult females from Armidale and three juvenile possums were housed in the Brisbane enclosures. As the Brisbane, Adelaide, and Armidale possums received the same photoperiod and environmental conditions, some factor must have inhibited breeding activity in the Adelaide possums and to a lesser extent in the Armidale possums. The ability of the Armidale possums to give birth and wean their young after 2 years in Brisbane would suggest that relocated possums require up to 2 years in order to adjust sufficiently to their new environment to reproduce. However, the failure of the Adelaide possums to reproduce successfully after a similar period of time in Brisbane suggests that certain environmental differences inhibit the ability of different populations of possums to adjust to a new environment.
© 1999 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
Q-Index Code C1

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Biomedical Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 10 Jun 2008, 14:03:40 EST