Negotiating Indigenous reconciliation: Territorial rights and governance in Nunavut

Jull, Peter (1999) Negotiating Indigenous reconciliation: Territorial rights and governance in Nunavut. Arena Journal, 13: 17-23.


Author Jull, Peter
Title Negotiating Indigenous reconciliation: Territorial rights and governance in Nunavut
Journal name Arena Journal   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1320-6567
Publication date 1999
Sub-type Article (original research)
Issue 13
Start page 17
End page 23
Total pages 7
Editor J. Hinkson
G. Sharp
S. Cooper
Place of publication Fitzroy, VIC, Australia
Publisher Arena Printing and Publishing
Collection year 1999
Language eng
Subject C1
750600 Government and Politics
379902 Aboriginal Studies
Formatted abstract
In April 1999 a new jurisdiction became the largest and least populous member of the Canadian federation. Nunavut, significantly meaning 'our land' in the language of the overwhelming Inuit majority, has only 27,000 people. These people live in small towns, villages, and hunting camps scattered around the treeless islands and coasts of Canada's Eastern Arctic. Larger than Quebec or Australia's Queensland, there are no roads joining Nunavut's communities, nor tying the region to the rest of Canada. In recent years the links have been scheduled, including charter aircraft, an annual sea-lift for staples and heavy materials (ice conditions permitting), and, the broadcast and computer media which will knit the region into Canada and the world.
Q-Index Code C1

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: Rotary Centre for International Studies in Peace and Conflict Resolution Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 10 Jun 2008, 13:53:42 EST