A new technique for coconut (Cocos nucifera) germplasm collection from remote sites: culturability of embryos following low-temperature incubation

Samosir, Y. M. S., Godwin, I. D. and Adkins, S. W. (1999) A new technique for coconut (Cocos nucifera) germplasm collection from remote sites: culturability of embryos following low-temperature incubation. Australian Journal of Botany, 47 1: 69-75. doi:10.1071/BT97067


Author Samosir, Y. M. S.
Godwin, I. D.
Adkins, S. W.
Title A new technique for coconut (Cocos nucifera) germplasm collection from remote sites: culturability of embryos following low-temperature incubation
Journal name Australian Journal of Botany   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0067-1924
Publication date 1999
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1071/BT97067
Volume 47
Issue 1
Start page 69
End page 75
Total pages 7
Place of publication Canberra
Publisher CSIRO
Collection year 1999
Language eng
Subject C1
620205 Tropical fruit
300399 Horticulture not elsewhere classified
Abstract A new technique for coconut (Cocos nucifera L.) germplasm collection was evaluated in the laboratory and tested in the field in Indonesia. The technique involved the non-sterile isolation of embryos, and incubation in sterile ascorbic acid solution (1 mg L-1) at 5 +/- 1 degrees C in the dark. During this incubation period the embryos could be transported and/or stored for a period of up to 4 days without embryo viability loss. Following this period the embryos were surface sterilised with sodium hypochlorite (1.5% w/v) for 20 min, washed with sterile water and cultured in a liquid Y3 basal nutrient medium supplemented with Morel and Wetmore vitamins, sucrose (175 mM) and activated charcoal (2.5 g L-1). After two weeks the embryos were subcultured onto a solid medium of similar constitution to encourage germination. Germinated embryos grew and produced healthy plants with normal morphology. Despite mild chilling injury as indicated by elevated ethylene production and solute leakage, the transported embryos retained viability with normal morphology. Using the low-temperature incubation treatment, the microorganism density in the ascorbic acid solution was kept low while that around other embryos kept at higher temperatures (25 degrees C) increased. Even though embryos were exposed to a low-temperature treatment for up to 4 days they were able to germinate (95% viable) and grow in an identical fashion to freshly cultured embryos.
Keyword Plant Sciences
Chilling Injury
Growth
Ethylene
Q-Index Code C1

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Agriculture and Food Sciences
 
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