A follow-up study of remote trauma teleconsultations

Tachakra, S., Loane, M. and Uche, C. U. (2000) A follow-up study of remote trauma teleconsultations. Telemedicine and Telecare, 6 6: 330-334. doi:10.1258/1357633001936003


Author Tachakra, S.
Loane, M.
Uche, C. U.
Title A follow-up study of remote trauma teleconsultations
Journal name Telemedicine and Telecare   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1357-633X
Publication date 2000
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1258/1357633001936003
Volume 6
Issue 6
Start page 330
End page 334
Total pages 5
Editor R. Wootton
Place of publication London, UK
Publisher Royal Society of Medicine
Collection year 2000
Language eng
Subject C1
329999 Medical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
730199 Clinical health not specific to particular organs, diseases and conditions
Abstract We conducted a follow-up study of patients who had attended a nurse-led minor accident and treatment service (MATS) and who had participated in a teleconsultation. Over three and a half years, 31,510 patients had attended the MATS unit and 1854 patients (5.9%) of these had participated in a teleconsultation. Of the 1854 telemedicine patients, 1199 had been referred to hospital or clinic and 1153 had actually attended. Retrospective examination of the relevant hospital records showed that in 25 cases (2%) the original telediagnosis was considered incorrect at face-to-face review and that treatment was either begun or changed in 264 cases (23%). All patients, including those discharged home after the teleconsultation, were sent a questionnaire about any changes to their injury. Of the 655 patients discharged home, a questionnaire response was obtained from 598 (91%). Following discharge, 43 of these patients had sought help from another health-care provider (the majority from their general practitioner). Of the 46 patients referred to hospital who did not keep their follow-up appointments, questionnaire results were obtained from 35 (76%). Nine of these patients had sought help from another health-care provider (the majority from their general practitioner) but there had been no change in diagnosis or treatment. Our findings suggest that teleconsultations are an effective means of delivering minor injuries care.
Keyword Health Care Sciences & Services
Q-Index Code C1

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: Centre for Online Health Publications
 
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