Managing small heritage sites with interpretation and community involvement

Carter, Bill and Grimwade, Gordon (2000) Managing small heritage sites with interpretation and community involvement. International Journal of Heritage Studies, 6 1: 33-48. doi:10.1080/135272500363724


Author Carter, Bill
Grimwade, Gordon
Title Managing small heritage sites with interpretation and community involvement
Journal name International Journal of Heritage Studies   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1470-3610
1352-7258
Publication date 2000-03
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/135272500363724
Volume 6
Issue 1
Start page 33
End page 48
Total pages 16
Editor P. Howard
Place of publication Plymouth, U.K.
Publisher Taylor & Francis (Routledge)
Collection year 2000
Language eng
Subject C1
310102 Heritage and Conservation
750801 Preserving the built environment
Abstract In heritage site management, there is often a strong reliance on preservation, sometimes to the exclusion of contemporary use.The result is a tendency to remove heritage sites from the experience of the community who 'owns' the heritage. At the site level, heritage management does not always use the full range of available tools; largely because of the emphasis on preservation. Case studies from rural Queensland, Australia, show that even relatively recent industrial and historical archaeology sites can be conserved and presented to benefit both the sites and local communities. There are several components to ultimate success, broadly encompassing a broader recognition of site values, pragmatic management and pro-active presentation. Smaller heritage sites may be modest in appearance, but they are still worthy of conservation. They may not attract large numbers of visitors like Stonehenge or the Acropolis but they are capable of providing socio-economic advantages for local communities and transferring knowledge of the past to future generations.
Formatted abstract
In heritage site management, there is often a strong reliance on preservation, sometimes to the exclusion of contemporary use.The result is a tendency to remove heritage sites from the experience of the community who 'owns' the heritage. At the site level, heritage management does not always use the full range of available tools; largely because of the emphasis on preservation. Case studies from rural Queensland, Australia, show that even relatively recent industrial and historical archaeology sites can be conserved and presented to benefit both the sites and local communities.

There are several components to ultimate success, broadly encompassing a broader recognition of site values, pragmatic management and pro-active presentation. Smaller heritage sites may be modest in appearance, but they are still worthy of conservation. They may not attract large numbers of visitors like Stonehenge or the Acropolis but they are capable of providing socio-economic advantages for local communities and transferring knowledge of the past to future generations.
© 2000 Taylor & Francis Ltd
Keyword Australia
Cultural heritage
Heritage management
Queensland
Interpretation
Rural archaeology
Q-Index Code C1

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Historical and Philosophical Inquiry
 
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Created: Tue, 10 Jun 2008, 13:06:09 EST