Method of handling affects post-capture encounter probabilities in male Hypolimnas bolina (L.) (Nymphalidae)

Kemp, Darrell J. and Zalucki, Myron P. (1999) Method of handling affects post-capture encounter probabilities in male Hypolimnas bolina (L.) (Nymphalidae). Journal of the Lepidopterists Society, 53 4: 138-141.


Author Kemp, Darrell J.
Zalucki, Myron P.
Title Method of handling affects post-capture encounter probabilities in male Hypolimnas bolina (L.) (Nymphalidae)
Formatted title
Method of handling affects post-capture encounter probabilities in male Hypolimnas bolina (L.) (Nymphalidae)
Journal name Journal of the Lepidopterists Society   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0024-0966
Publication date 1999
Sub-type Article (original research)
Volume 53
Issue 4
Start page 138
End page 141
Total pages 4
Place of publication Los Angeles, CA, U.S.A.
Publisher Lepidopterists Society
Collection year 2000
Language eng
Subject C1
270500 Zoology
780105 Biological sciences
Formatted abstract
Mark-recapture studies of butterfly populations are often plagued by low recapture rates, which make population estimation problematic. One reason for low recaptures is that the handling process of capture, marking and release contributes to low and unequal catchability of marked individuals. Here we report the results of an experiment conducted to evaluate the hypothesis that cooling individuals prior to release minimizes handling effects. The post-capture difference in site fidelity of territorial male Hypolimnas bolina (L.) (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae) was compared among three groups in Townsville (Queensland, Australia) sampled in 1998 and 1999: (1) males handled normally, (2) males chilled prior to release, and (3) uncaught controls. Chilling was achieved by holding males for 210 seconds in a paper envelope placed on a block of ice wrapped in newspaper. Unchilled males showed significantly reduced site fidelity compared to both control and chilled butterflies. Furthermore, chilled butterflies resumed activity after capture in a manner similar to uncaught controls. These results indicate that chilling has the potential to minimize the adverse effects of handling on subsequent butterfly catchability. Since 'equal catchability' of caught and uncaught individuals is a critical assumption of mark-release-recapture programmes, this method has the potential to greatly increase the accuracy of subsequent population estimates.
Keyword Catchability
Mark-release-recapture
Censusing
Population estimation
Q-Index Code C1

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: School of Biological Sciences Publications
Ecology Centre Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 10 Jun 2008, 12:57:18 EST