Bathymetry and seafloor mapping via one dimensional inversion and conductivity depth imaging of AEM

Vrbancich, J., Fullagar, P. K. and Macnae, J. (2000) Bathymetry and seafloor mapping via one dimensional inversion and conductivity depth imaging of AEM. Exploration Geophysics, 31 4: 603-610.


Author Vrbancich, J.
Fullagar, P. K.
Macnae, J.
Title Bathymetry and seafloor mapping via one dimensional inversion and conductivity depth imaging of AEM
Journal name Exploration Geophysics   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0812-3985
1834-7533
Publication date 2000
DOI 10.1071/EG00603
Volume 31
Issue 4
Start page 603
End page 610
Total pages 8
Place of publication Sydney
Publisher CSIRO Publishing
Collection year 2000
Language eng
Subject C1
260100 Geology
640100 Exploration
Abstract This study examines the application of airborne electromagnetic (AEM) methodologies to bathymetry in shallow seawater and to map seafloor conductivity. Conductivity versus depth sections have been generated from a recent helicopter-borne DIGHEMV survey (operating vertical coaxial and horizontal coplanar transmitter-receiver coil geometries) of lower Port Jackson, Sydney Harbour. The sea depth ranges from about 1 to 30 m. Acoustic bathymetric soundings and marine seismic survey data provide the true seawater layer thickness and estimates of depth to bedrock respectively over most of the EM survey region. This complementary data can be used to evaluate the accuracy of airborne electromagnetic bathymetry. The efficacy of 1D conductivity inversion and rapid conductivity-depth imaging was investigated for shallow seawater overlaying marine sand sediments and sandstone. The inversion constructs layered conductivities which satisfy the AEM data to an accuracy consistent with the observational uncertainties. Inverted frequencies ranged from 328 to 55300 Hz. Resolution of the sea depth gave good agreement with known bathymetry (within about 10% or better) when inversion was unconstrained. Approximate conductivity-depth images obtained using program "EM Flow" gave similar agreement. Both inversion methods clearly identify the location and burial depth of higher resistivity regions associated with shallow marine sandstone bedrock. In addition to measuring water depths to about 30 m, this study has shown that the AEM DIGHEM technique provides a capability for remote sensing of seabed properties and offers the potential to detect areas of shallow bedrock and differentiate between consolidated and unconsolidated sediment in areas of seawater deeper than 25 m.
Keyword bathymetry
airborne
electromanetic
inversion
conductivity-depth-imaging
EM FLOW
seafloor
Q-Index Code C1

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Engineering Publications
 
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