Immune and pathophysiological responses to different strains of Giardia duodenalis in neonatal mice

Williamson, A. L., O'Donoghue, P. J., Upcroft, J. A. and Upcroft, P. (2000) Immune and pathophysiological responses to different strains of Giardia duodenalis in neonatal mice. International Journal for Parasitology, 30 2: 129-136. doi:10.1016/S0020-7519(99)00181-2


Author Williamson, A. L.
O'Donoghue, P. J.
Upcroft, J. A.
Upcroft, P.
Title Immune and pathophysiological responses to different strains of Giardia duodenalis in neonatal mice
Formatted title
Immune and pathophysiological responses to different strains of Giardia duodenalis in neonatal mice
Journal name International Journal for Parasitology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0020-7519
1879-0135
Publication date 2000-02-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/S0020-7519(99)00181-2
Volume 30
Issue 2
Start page 129
End page 136
Total pages 8
Place of publication Oxford, U. K.
Publisher Elsevier Science
Collection year 2000
Language eng
Subject C1
270300 Microbiology
730101 Infectious diseases
Formatted abstract
Numerous studies have demonstrated various strain differences between Giardia isolates, but little is known about the immunology and pathogenesis of infections. This study aimed to compare host responses to strains of Giardia duodenalis differing in levels of virulence and pathogenicity and, by doing so, elucidate the mechanisms via which pathogenic strains establish infections. Marked differences were found in the infection dynamics, histopathological responses and serum antibody responses of neonatal mice infected with either G. duodenalis strain BRIS/83/HEPU/106 (isolated from a human) or BRIS/95/HEPU/2041 (isolated from a sulphur-crested cockatoo, Cacatua galerita). Infections with the bird strain were more intense (6.7-times greater) and persisted longer (by 14 days) than infections with the human strain. The bird strain was more pathogenic and caused greater pathophysiological alteration to the gut mucosa, including increased villous atrophy, hyperplasia of goblet cells and vacuolated epithelial cells. Mice infected with the bird strain produced less serum anti-Giardia IgA and IgM, but more total (non-specific) serum IgA than those infected with the human strain of Giardia. This suggests that avian G. duodenalis strains are infective for mammalian hosts and may contribute to zoonotic infections. Furthermore, infection of mice with BRIS/95/HEPU/2041 serves as a good experimental model to provide further insight into the mechanisms via which G. duodenalis causes disease.
© 2000 Australian Society for Parasitology Inc. Published by Elsevier Science. All rights reserved.
Keyword Parasitology
Cell Hyperplasia
Giardia Duodenalis
Histopathology
Mucosa
Serum Antibodies
Villous Atrophy
Animal-model
Lamblia
Intestine
Infection
Protozoa
Antibody
Mouse
Q-Index Code C1

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 26 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 25 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Tue, 10 Jun 2008, 11:23:21 EST