Access and equity in the provision of general practitioner services for women in Australia

Young, A. F., Dobson, A. J. and Byles, J. E. (2000) Access and equity in the provision of general practitioner services for women in Australia. Australia and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 24 5: 474-480.


Author Young, A. F.
Dobson, A. J.
Byles, J. E.
Title Access and equity in the provision of general practitioner services for women in Australia
Journal name Australia and New Zealand Journal of Public Health   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1326-0200
Publication date 2000
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1467-842X.2000.tb00496.x
Volume 24
Issue 5
Start page 474
End page 480
Total pages 7
Place of publication Canberra
Publisher Public Health Assoc
Collection year 2000
Language eng
Subject C1
321214 Health and Community Services
730308 Health policy economic outcomes
Abstract Objective: To assess geographical equity in the availability, accessibility and out-of-pocket costs of general practitioner (GP) services for women in Australia. Method: Data on general practice consultations during 1995 and 1996 for women aged 18-23 years (n=5,260), 45-50 years (n=7,898) and 70-75 years (n=6,542) in the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health were obtained from the Health Insurance Commission. A sub-study of 4,577 participants provided data on access to health services. Results: Older women were more likely to have no out-of-pocket costs for their GP consultations, but in all age groups, the proportion was lower in rural areas than in urban areas (older age: 60% rural areas, 76% capital cities; mid-age: 24% rural areas, 40% capital cities; young age: 35% rural areas, 52% capital cities). Among mid-aged women, the median out-of-pocket cost per consultation ranged from $2.11 in capital cities to $6.48 in remote areas. Women living in rural and remote areas gave lower ratings for the availability, accessibility and affordability of health services than women living in urban areas. Conclusions This study has shown a striking gradient in financial and nonfinancial barriers to health care associated with area of residence. Implications: The geographical imbalance in the supply and distribution of GP services in Australia has long been recognised but inequities in the affordability of services must also be addressed. Longitudinal survey data and Health Insurance Commission data provide a means to evaluate policies designed to improve access to health services in rural and remote areas.
Keyword Public, Environmental & Occupational Health
Consultations
Satisfaction
Sex
Q-Index Code C1

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Population Health Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 19 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 182 Abstract Views  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Tue, 10 Jun 2008, 10:57:45 EST