The essential requirement for superoxide radical and nitric oxide formation for normal physiological function and healthy aging

Linnane, Anthony W., Kios, Michael and Vitetta, Luis (2007) The essential requirement for superoxide radical and nitric oxide formation for normal physiological function and healthy aging. Mitochondrion, 7 1-2: 1-5. doi:10.1016/j.mito.2006.11.009


Author Linnane, Anthony W.
Kios, Michael
Vitetta, Luis
Title The essential requirement for superoxide radical and nitric oxide formation for normal physiological function and healthy aging
Journal name Mitochondrion   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1567-7249
1872-8278
Publication date 2007-02
Year available 2006
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.mito.2006.11.009
Volume 7
Issue 1-2
Start page 1
End page 5
Total pages 5
Place of publication Amsterdam, Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier Science
Collection year 2008
Language eng
Subject 320301 Clinical Chemistry
C1
730203 Health related to ageing
1104 Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Abstract Contrary to the dogma that superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide formation are highly deleterious to cell function and healthy aging, we suggest this premise is flawed. Superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide formation are essential to normal cellular function; they constitute a second messenger system absolutely required for the regulation of the metabolome. Embraced within this regulation is the modulation of cellular redox poise, bioenergy output, gene expression and cell differentiation. A key component in the overall process is coenzyme Q10 whose prooxidant function through the formation of superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide is a major factor in the overall processes. The free radical gas, nitric oxide (similarly to superoxide anion), functions in the regulation of a wide range of cell systems. As part of the normal physiological process, superoxide anion and NO function separately and interactively as second messengers. Superoxide anion and nitric oxide play an intrinsic role in the regulated ordered turnover of proteins, rather than randomly cause protein damage and their inactivation. The proposition that metabolic free radical formation is unequivocally deleterious to cell function is rebutted; their toxicity as primary effectors in the aging process has been overemphasized. The concept that a dietary supplement of high concentrations of small-molecule antioxidants is a prophylactic/amelioration therapy for the aging process and age-associated diseases is questioned as to its clinical validity. Copyright © 2006 Mitochondria Research Society Published by Elsevier B.V.
Keyword Coenzyme Q10
Redox poise
Gene regulation
Metabolic regulation
Superoxide anion
Hydrogen peroxide
Nitric oxide
Peroxynitrite
Prooxidants
Antioxidants
Protein turnover
Aging
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Additional Notes Available online 5 December 2006

 
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Created: Tue, 13 May 2008, 13:53:14 EST by Maree Knight on behalf of School of Medicine