Acquisition of symbiotic dinoflagellates (Symbiodinium) by juveniles of the coral Acropora longicyathus

Gomez-Cabrera, M. del C., Ortiz, J. C., Loh, W. K. W., Ward, S. and Hoegh-Guldberg, O. (2008) Acquisition of symbiotic dinoflagellates (Symbiodinium) by juveniles of the coral Acropora longicyathus. Coral Reefs, 27 1: 219-226. doi:10.1007/s00338-007-0315-x


Author Gomez-Cabrera, M. del C.
Ortiz, J. C.
Loh, W. K. W.
Ward, S.
Hoegh-Guldberg, O.
Title Acquisition of symbiotic dinoflagellates (Symbiodinium) by juveniles of the coral Acropora longicyathus
Formatted title Acquisition of symbiotic dinoflagellates (Symbiodinium) by juveniles of the coral Acropora longicyathus
Journal name Coral Reefs   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0722-4028
Publication date 2008
Year available 2007
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s00338-007-0315-x
Volume 27
Issue 1
Start page 219
End page 226
Total pages 8
Editor P. K. Swart
R. E. Dodge
Place of publication New York
Publisher Springer
Collection year 2008
Language eng
Subject 270205 Genetic Development (incl. Sex Determination)
C1
770306 Integrated (ecosystem) assessment and management
Abstract Scleractinian corals may acquire Symbiodinium from their parents (vertically) or from the environment (horizontally). In the present study, adult colonies of the coral Acropora longicyathus from One Tree Island (OTI) on the southern Great Barrier Reef (Australia) acquired two distinct varieties of symbiotic dinoflagellates (Symbiodinium) from the environment. Adult colonies had either Symbiodinium from clade C (86.7%) or clade A (5.3%), or a mixture of both clades A and C (8.0% of all colonies). In contrast, all 10-day-old juveniles were associated with Symbiodinium from clade A, while 83-day-old colonies contained clades A, C and D even though they were growing at the same location. Symbiodinium from clade A were dominant in both 10- and 83-day-old juveniles (99 and 97% of all recruits, respectively), while clade D was also found in 31% of 83-day-old juveniles. Experimental manipulation also revealed that parental association (with clade A or C), or the location within the OTI reef, did not influence which clade of symbiont was acquired by juvenile corals. The differences between the genetic identity of populations of Symbiodinium resident in juveniles and adult A. longicyathus suggest that ontogenetic changes in the symbiosis may occur during the development of scleractinian corals. Whether or not these changes are due to host selective processes or differences in the physical environment associated with juvenile versus adult colonies remains to be determined.
Keyword Symbiodinium
Acropora longicyathus
Coral recruit
Symbiont acquisition
Symbiosis
Dinoflagellate
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code

 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 20 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 22 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 202 Abstract Views  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Sun, 04 May 2008, 21:23:46 EST by Peter Fogarty on behalf of Centre for Marine Studies