A palynological record for the humid tropics of northeastern Australia through the last million years from site ODP 820

Moss, Patrick and Kershaw, Peter (2007). A palynological record for the humid tropics of northeastern Australia through the last million years from site ODP 820. In: Norm R. Catto, Quaternary International; XVII Inqua Congress the Tropics: Heat Engine of the Quaternary. XVII International Union for Quaternary Research Congress - The Topics: Heat Engine of the Quarternary, Cairns, Australia, (205-205). 28 July-3 August 2007. doi:10.1016/j.quaint.2007.04.001


Author Moss, Patrick
Kershaw, Peter
Title of paper A palynological record for the humid tropics of northeastern Australia through the last million years from site ODP 820
Conference name XVII International Union for Quaternary Research Congress - The Topics: Heat Engine of the Quarternary
Conference location Cairns, Australia
Conference dates 28 July-3 August 2007
Convener Professor John Chappell
Proceedings title Quaternary International; XVII Inqua Congress the Tropics: Heat Engine of the Quaternary   Check publisher's open access policy
Place of Publication Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Pergamon
Publication Year 2007
Year available 2007
Sub-type Published abstract
DOI 10.1016/j.quaint.2007.04.001
ISSN 1040-6182
Editor Norm R. Catto
Volume 167-168
Issue Supplement 1
Start page 205
End page 205
Total pages 1
Collection year 2008
Language eng
Abstract/Summary A high resolution pollen record from the ODP 820 marine core for the last million years is presented. It is chronologically controlled by marine stratigraphic data.This record provides a picture of substantial vegetation and environmental change for the humid tropics region of northeastern Australia. It is the first largely continuous record in Australia to cover this length of time in any detail, although sediment accumulation rates decrease with increasing age. The influence of orbital forcing (particularly eccentricity and obliquity) is clearly present in the record providing good support for the proposed age model based on the marine stratigraphy, but each isotope stage contains some distinctive features. Superimposed on these cyclical patterns are abrupt and sustained changes in the representation of many taxa and community types that may be explained by a combination of regional changes in oceanic and atmospheric circulation systems throughout this time period, along with the impacts of people in the later part of the record (i.e. last 45,000 years BP).
Subjects 260113 Palynology
E1
780104 Earth sciences
Q-Index Code EX
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Wed, 30 Apr 2008, 11:59:35 EST by Deirdre Timo on behalf of School of Geography, Planning & Env Management