Prevalence of disruptive behaviour displayed by older people in community and residential respite care settings

Neville, Christine C. and Byrne, Gerard J. A. (2007) Prevalence of disruptive behaviour displayed by older people in community and residential respite care settings. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, 16 2: 81-85. doi:10.1111/j.1447-0349.2007.00450.x


Author Neville, Christine C.
Byrne, Gerard J. A.
Title Prevalence of disruptive behaviour displayed by older people in community and residential respite care settings
Journal name International Journal of Mental Health Nursing   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1445-8330
1447-0349
Publication date 2007-04
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1447-0349.2007.00450.x
Open Access Status
Volume 16
Issue 2
Start page 81
End page 85
Total pages 5
Editor B. Happell
T. Martin
M. Clinton
A. Arthur
Place of publication Richmond, VIC, Australia
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Asia
Collection year 2008
Language eng
Subject 321106 Aged Care Nursing
730302 Nursing
730219 Behaviour and health
Abstract The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of disruptive behaviour displayed by older people in community and residential respite care settings. The specific objectives were to (i) obtain an estimate of the frequency of disruptive behaviour displayed by older people in the community setting before residential respite care; (ii) characterize older people being admitted for residential respite care; and (iii) obtain an estimate of the frequency of disruptive behaviour displayed by older people in residential respite care. A quantitative approach using a cross-sectional survey was employed in the community and in the residential aged care facilities. The older people (n = 100) had a mean age of 81.8 years (range 66–96 years). The older people were being admitted from their homes for booked respite care at residential aged care facilities in a regional Australian city. Home caregivers and nurses rated disruptive behaviour using the Dementia Behaviour Disturbance Scale (DBDS). Reliability data for the DBDS are provided. As expected, in both community and residential respite settings, older people with dementia (29%) scored significantly higher on the DBDS than people without dementia. In addition, DBDS scores were unexpectedly higher in the community setting than in the respite setting. These findings should be taken into consideration by primary health-care professionals when offering treatment options to the home caregivers and by staff in the residential aged care facilities that offer respite.
Keyword Aged
Dementia
Dementia behaviour disturbance scale
Nursing research
Respite
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Article first published online 8 March 2007

 
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Created: Wed, 23 Apr 2008, 17:53:28 EST by Allison Peacock on behalf of School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work