Metropolitan colonisation and the reinvention of place: Class polarisation along the Cessnock-Pokolbin fault-line

Holmes, John and Hartig, Kate (2007) Metropolitan colonisation and the reinvention of place: Class polarisation along the Cessnock-Pokolbin fault-line. Geographical Research, 45 1: 54-70. doi:10.1111/j.1745-5871.2007.00404.x

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Author Holmes, John
Hartig, Kate
Title Metropolitan colonisation and the reinvention of place: Class polarisation along the Cessnock-Pokolbin fault-line
Journal name Geographical Research   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1745-5863
1745-5871
Publication date 2007-03
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1745-5871.2007.00404.x
Volume 45
Issue 1
Start page 54
End page 70
Total pages 16
Editor A. Conacker
G. Curry
R. Jones
Place of publication Carlton, Victoria
Publisher Blackwell
Collection year 2008
Language eng
Subject 370402 Social and Cultural Geography
C1
750302 Class
Abstract This paper examines the emergence of a sharply delineated socioeconomic and sociocultural fault-line between Cessnock's former coal towns and the immediately adjacent Hunter Valley Wine Country, centred on Pokolbin. We provide evidence that divergent culturally-related class identities act as mutually reinforcing constraints on reciprocity between job-deficit former coal towns and the job-surplus wine country. We relate this to a consideration of time-space dimensions in the interdependencies between the class and place identities of Cessnock and Pokolbin. These identities have been influenced by metropolitan colonisation, with the markedly differentiated absorption of these two locales into the enlarged metropolitan population-work-welfare-housing-leisure agglomeration. Further, we propose that the former coal towns and the wine country can both be seen as place-specific representations of wider class-related changes within Australian society. Our interpretations are founded on three current research directions: first, the role of culture as a critical intervening variable in class identities and actions; second, the current flux in class formations, most notably the loss of self-identity and solidarity in the working class and the emergence of a new middle-class sector dedicated to self-realisation and self-fulfilment; and third, recognition of class formation as a geographical process.
Keyword class identity
place identity
place reinvention
Cessnock
Pokolbin
Hunter Valley Wine Country
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: School of Geography, Planning and Environmental Management Publications
School of Architecture Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 5 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 6 times in Scopus Article | Citations
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Created: Wed, 23 Apr 2008, 11:42:41 EST by Deirdre Timo on behalf of School of Geography, Planning & Env Management