Mechanosensitive channel of large conductance

Kloda, Anna, Petrov, Evgeny, Meyer, Grischa R., Nguyen, Thom, Hurst, Annette C., Hool, Livia and Martinac, Boris (2008) Mechanosensitive channel of large conductance. The International Journal of Biochemistry & Cell Biology, 40 2: 164-169. doi:10.1016/j.biocel.2007.02.003


Author Kloda, Anna
Petrov, Evgeny
Meyer, Grischa R.
Nguyen, Thom
Hurst, Annette C.
Hool, Livia
Martinac, Boris
Title Mechanosensitive channel of large conductance
Journal name The International Journal of Biochemistry & Cell Biology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1357-2725
Publication date 2008
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.biocel.2007.02.003
Volume 40
Issue 2
Start page 164
End page 169
Total pages 6
Editor G. J. Laurent
Place of publication United Kingdom
Publisher Pergamon
Collection year 2008
Language eng
Subject C1
270104 Membrane Biology
780105 Biological sciences
Abstract Microbial cells constitutively express the Large Conductance Mechanosensitive Channel which opens in response to stretch forces in the lipid bilayer. The channel protein forms a homopentamer with each subunit containing two transmembrane regions and gates via the bilayer mechanism evoked by hydrophobic mismatch and changes in the membrane curvature and/or transbilayer pressure profile. During the stationary phase and during osmotic shock the channel protein is up-regulated to prevent cell lysis. Pharmacological potential of MscL may involve discovery of new age antibiotics to combat multiple drug-resistant bacterial strains.
Keyword MscL
Mechanosensitive ion channels
Lipid bilayer
Hydrophobic mismatch
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code

 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 23 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 24 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Tue, 22 Apr 2008, 16:25:56 EST by Timothy Hazelton on behalf of School of Biomedical Sciences