La represion de lenguas nacionales bajo el autoritarismo en el siglo XX: Los casos de Estonia y Cataluna

Skerrett, Delaney Michael (2007) La represion de lenguas nacionales bajo el autoritarismo en el siglo XX: Los casos de Estonia y Cataluna. Revista de Llengua i Dret, 48 251-311.

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Author Skerrett, Delaney Michael
Title La represion de lenguas nacionales bajo el autoritarismo en el siglo XX: Los casos de Estonia y Cataluna
Formatted title
La represión de lenguas nacionales bajo el autoritarismo en el siglo XX: Los casos de Estonia y Cataluña
Translated title The repression of national languages ​​under authoritarianism in the twentieth century: the cases of Estonia and Catalonia
Language of Title spa
eng
Journal name Revista de Llengua i Dret   Check publisher's open access policy
Language of Journal Name spa
ISSN 0212-5056
2013-1453
Publication date 2007-12
Sub-type Article (original research)
Open Access Status File (Publisher version)
Volume 48
Start page 251
End page 311
Total pages 61
Editor A. Alsina
Place of publication Barcelona, Spain
Publisher Escola d'Administració Pública de Catalunya
Collection year 2008
Language spa
eng
Subject C1
380206 Language in Time and Space (incl. Historical Linguistics, Dialectology)
751001 Languages and literature
Formatted abstract
In the 20th century, the Soviet regime in Estonia and the Franco regime in Catalonia tried to extend their political ideologies. Autochthonous languages were controlled through censorship and repression. Furthermore, as part of their ideologies, Francoist and Soviet leaders wanted to replace indigenous languages with their own (Russian and Spanish), since these were a major part of the new order they were trying to create. This thesis compares and contrasts the various methods of language control to demonstrate that centralized multilingual states, whatever their political ideology, can employ surprisingly similar systems, depriving language communities of the right to use and develop their own languages.

In both cases, most people paid scant attention to the official public language or its ideology, and in Estonia, one can talk of two socio-linguistic worlds, one official and Sovietized and the other unofficial and very national in character (P. Vihalemm & Lauristin, 1997). The Catalans also tenaciously maintained their private cultural and linguistic world. The effect of centralized control on national culture and, consequently on the language also, should nonetheless not be overlooked: language tolerance of Russian-speakers (in the case of Estonia) and Spanish-speakers (in the case of Catalonia) even if they spoke Estonian or Catalan can be viewed as part of the continuation of the «minority complex»1 (Druviete, 2003, p. 5) that took shape under authoritarian rule. By the way, this type of linguistic accord is less frequent in Estonia but it still exists and in Catalonia, it seems pretty common. The ubiquitousness of state control in (socio)linguistic areas resulted in the «unconscious adaptation to the cognitive and behavioral» pattern imposed by the regime.»2 (P. Vihalemm & Lauristin, 1997, p. 108).

1. «Minority complex».
2. «The unconscious adaptation to the [...] cognitive and behavioural patterns».
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2008 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Languages and Cultures Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 22 Apr 2008, 12:50:37 EST by Jo Grimmond on behalf of School of Languages and Cultures