An analytical framework for career research in the post-modern era

McMahon, Mary and Watson, Mark (2007) An analytical framework for career research in the post-modern era. International Journal for Educational and Vocational Guidance, 7 3: 169-179.


Author McMahon, Mary
Watson, Mark
Title An analytical framework for career research in the post-modern era
Journal name International Journal for Educational and Vocational Guidance   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1573-1782
Publication date 2007-11
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s10775-007-9126-4
Volume 7
Issue 3
Start page 169
End page 179
Total pages 11
Place of publication Amsterdam, Netherlands
Publisher Springer
Collection year 2008
Language eng
Subject C1
339999 Other Education
749999 Education and training not elsewhere classified
Abstract Career psychology has witnessed a shift from approaches informed by tenets of the modern world to include approaches informed by the post-modern world as it strives to remain relevant. This shift is most evident in career theory and practice where developments reflect the influence of constructivism, but it is less evident in career research which has remained dominated by methodologies of the positivist worldview. These predominantly empirical methodologies seem incongruent with post-modern tenets. This article applies the constructivist Systems Theory Framework of career development as an analytical framework within which to consider career research in the post-modern era.
Keyword Systems Theory Framework
Career psychology
Constructivist
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
School of Education Publications
 
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Created: Mon, 21 Apr 2008, 14:15:43 EST by Rebecca Donohoe on behalf of Faculty of Social & Behavioural Sciences