Council of Australian Governments' (COAG) initiative for young people with disability in residential aged care: What are the issues for acquired brain injury?

Foster, Michele, Fleming, Jennifer and Tilse, C. F. (2007) Council of Australian Governments' (COAG) initiative for young people with disability in residential aged care: What are the issues for acquired brain injury?. Brain Impairment, 8 3: 312-322. doi:10.1375/brim.8.3.312


Author Foster, Michele
Fleming, Jennifer
Tilse, C. F.
Title Council of Australian Governments' (COAG) initiative for young people with disability in residential aged care: What are the issues for acquired brain injury?
Journal name Brain Impairment   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1443-9646
Publication date 2007-12
Year available 2007
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1375/brim.8.3.312
Volume 8
Issue 3
Start page 312
End page 322
Total pages 11
Editor J. Douglas
R. Tate
Place of publication Bowen Hills, Qld, Australia
Publisher Published for the ASSBI by Australian Academic Press
Collection year 2008
Language eng
Subject C1
370203 Social Policy
730399 Health and support services not elsewhere classified
Abstract People surviving severe acquired brain injury (ABI) may potentially benefit from the Council of Australian Governments' (COAG) 5-year initiative for young people with disability in residential aged-care facilities. Yet critical examination of this policy initiative for ABI population is warranted for 2 reasons. First, reliance on the disability sector to resolve the complexities of long-term care for people with ABI detracts attention from systemic failures at the health/disability sector interface, and notably, debate concerning the role of, and right to rehabilitation. Second, the COAG initiative is being pursued within an extraordinarily complex and variable contemporary care environment, involving multiple services and sectors, and historically, high unmet need. This raises questions as to the adequacy and sustainability of care provided under the responsibility of state-based disability services. In this article, it is argued that long-term care for young people with severe ABI is better served by incorporating a health and rehabilitation perspective alongside a disability support approach. Although the effectiveness of rehabilitation may be contested in some instances of very severe ABI, nevertheless the role of rehabilitation in seeking to reduce the number of young people at risk of entering residential aged care needs to be addressed in policy solutions. It is also suggested that provision of long time care in the contemporary care environment involves a number of challenges due to the complex and changing patterns of need, diverse funding arrangements and mix of government and nongovernment services, and the increasing demand for care.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code

 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Wed, 16 Apr 2008, 11:51:37 EST by Elena Stewart on behalf of School of Social Work and Human Services