Psychosocial interventions to arrest cognitive decline in at-risk women

Travers, Helen, King, Robert, Byrne, Gerard J.A., Khoo, Soo K., Bartlett, Helen P. and Pachana, Nancy A. (2007). Psychosocial interventions to arrest cognitive decline in at-risk women. In: The Abstracts of the 42nd Annual Conference of the Australian Psychological Society; Australian Journal of Psychology. 42nd Annual Conference of the Australian Psychological Society, Brisbane, Australia, (351-351). 25-29 September, 2008. doi:10.1080/00049530701658675


Author Travers, Helen
King, Robert
Byrne, Gerard J.A.
Khoo, Soo K.
Bartlett, Helen P.
Pachana, Nancy A.
Title of paper Psychosocial interventions to arrest cognitive decline in at-risk women
Conference name 42nd Annual Conference of the Australian Psychological Society
Conference location Brisbane, Australia
Conference dates 25-29 September, 2008
Proceedings title The Abstracts of the 42nd Annual Conference of the Australian Psychological Society; Australian Journal of Psychology   Check publisher's open access policy
Place of Publication United Kingdom; Australia
Publisher Taylor & Francis
Publication Year 2007
DOI 10.1080/00049530701658675
ISSN 1742-9536
0004-9530
Volume 59
Issue 1; Supp.
Start page 351
End page 351
Total pages 1
Language eng
Abstract/Summary Age-related cognitive decline and dementia are major health issues in developed countries. Risk factors associated with these conditions include the presence of the apolipoprotein E isoform e4 (ApoE), premorbid IQ, cardiovascular disease, and lifestyle factors including level of physical activity and degree of involvement in intellectually stimulating activities. Evidence from several large-scale observational studies shows that regular engagement in these activities is associated with better cognitive function, less cognitive decline in later life and a lower incidence of dementia. In addition, intervention studies have demonstrated that the cognitive performance of older persons (with and without cognitive impairment) can be improved through brief training programs involving educational, physical and cognitive interventions. To date, however, there has been little investigation of the capacity of these interventions to slow the rate of deterioration among people with identified risk. To address this gap, we have developed a program of research to assess the efficacy and viability of interventions involving physical exercise and cognitive stimulation to arrest or slow cognitive decline in a group of at-risk women. The research evidence in relation to physical exercise, intellectual stimulation and cognitive decline and dementia will be summarised in this presentation and the proposed body of research outlined.
Subjects 321204 Mental Health
E3
730201 Women's health
730211 Mental health
Q-Index Code E3

 
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Created: Tue, 15 Apr 2008, 15:22:51 EST by Nicola De Silva on behalf of Australasian Centre on Ageing