Living with others: Mapping the routes to acculturation in a multicultural society

Liu, S. (2007) Living with others: Mapping the routes to acculturation in a multicultural society. International Journal of Intercultural Relations, 31 6: 761-778.


Author Liu, S.
Title Living with others: Mapping the routes to acculturation in a multicultural society
Journal name International Journal of Intercultural Relations   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0147-1767
Publication date 2007-11
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.ijintrel.2007.08.003
Volume 31
Issue 6
Start page 761
End page 778
Total pages 18
Editor Landis, D.
Place of publication USA
Publisher Elsevier
Collection year 2008
Language eng
Subject C1
420308 Multicultural, Intercultural and Cross-cultural Studies
751005 Communication across languages and cultures
Abstract This study investigated attitudes towards multiculturalism and their influence on acculturation strategies of both Anglo-Australians and Asian immigrants residing in the city of Brisbane, the third largest city of Australia. Data was obtained via a survey administered to 133 Asian immigrants and 108 Anglo-Australians, a total of 241 respondents. Results revealed discordance in attitudes towards multiculturalism between Asians and Australians, with Asians rating it higher as a benefit and lower as a threat as compared to Australians. While higher ratings on multiculturalism as a threat tended to be positively related to separation strategy, this linear association did not hold true for the minority group (Asians). For Asian respondents, those who perceived a moderate threat in multiculturalism were more likely supporters for separation. Our findings supported the assumption that multiculturalism is viewed as differentially beneficial for minority and majority groups. (C) 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Keyword Social Sciences, Interdisciplinary
Sociology
acculturation
integration
intergroup relations
multiculturalism
separation
Intergroup Relations
Majority Attitudes
Identification
Immigrants
Australia
Strategies
Germany
Adolescents
Adaptation
Psychology
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code

 
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