What older people do: Time use and exploring the link between role participation and life satisfaction in people aged 65 years and over

McKenna, Kryss, Broome, Kieran and Liddle, Jacki (2007) What older people do: Time use and exploring the link between role participation and life satisfaction in people aged 65 years and over. Australian Occupational Therapy Journal, 54 4: 273-284. doi:10.1111/j.1440-1630.2007.00642.x


Author McKenna, Kryss
Broome, Kieran
Liddle, Jacki
Title What older people do: Time use and exploring the link between role participation and life satisfaction in people aged 65 years and over
Journal name Australian Occupational Therapy Journal   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0045-0766
Publication date 2007-12
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1440-1630.2007.00642.x
Volume 54
Issue 4
Start page 273
End page 284
Total pages 12
Place of publication Carlton, Vic., Australia
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Asia
Collection year 2008
Language eng
Subject 321024 Rehabilitation and Therapy - Occupational and Physical
321007 Geriatrics and Gerontology
C1
730303 Occupational, speech and physiotherapy
Formatted abstract
Objectives: Data on time use and role participation can provide rich information that can help occupational therapists better understand older people's lives. This study aimed to (i) describe the time use and role participation of community-dwelling people aged 65 years and older, (ii) analyse whether time use and role participation changed with increasing age, and (iii) determine if there is a link between maintenance of role participation and life satisfaction in older age.

Methods: Using a cross-sectional design, interviews including the Activity Configuration, Role Checklist and Life Satisfaction Index-Z were used to collect data on 195 participants (mean age 75 years, 58.5% female).

Results: Participants spent most of their time on sleep (8.4 h/day), solitary leisure (4.5 h/day), instrumental activities of daily living (3.1 h/day), social leisure (2.7 h/day) and basic activities of daily living (2.6 h/day). The most common roles were friend (96.4%), family member (95.4%) and home maintainer (87.2%). Participants aged 75 years and older spent significantly more time on solitary leisure and less time on paid work and transport compared to those aged 65–74 years. Role maintenance was significantly related to greater life satisfaction in participants aged 75–84 years.

Conclusion: Older people's occupations and roles are diverse, and increasing age does not appear to reduce occupational or role engagement. The value of roles is not always reflected in the amount of time devoted to them and facilitating continued participation in valued roles may be important for older people's life satisfaction.
Keyword ageing
occupation
older adult care
personal satisfaction
Q-Index Code C1
Additional Notes Published Online: 29 Mar 2007

 
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Created: Tue, 08 Apr 2008, 09:32:17 EST