Abnormal Glucose Metabolism: Does Diet Interact with Sedentary Behaviour? The AusDiab Study

Reeves, Marina, Healy, Genevieve, Khan, Tanya, Dunstan, David, Shaw, Jonathan, Zimmet, Paul and Owen, Neville (2007). Abnormal Glucose Metabolism: Does Diet Interact with Sedentary Behaviour? The AusDiab Study. In: Malcolm Riley, Nutrition & Dietetics: Abstracts of the Dietitians Association of Australia 25th National Conference. Dietitians Association of Australia 25th National Conference:' Crunch Time', Hotel Grand Chancellor Hobart, (S34-S34). 24-26th May, 2007.


Author Reeves, Marina
Healy, Genevieve
Khan, Tanya
Dunstan, David
Shaw, Jonathan
Zimmet, Paul
Owen, Neville
Title of paper Abnormal Glucose Metabolism: Does Diet Interact with Sedentary Behaviour? The AusDiab Study
Conference name Dietitians Association of Australia 25th National Conference:' Crunch Time'
Conference location Hotel Grand Chancellor Hobart
Conference dates 24-26th May, 2007
Proceedings title Nutrition & Dietetics: Abstracts of the Dietitians Association of Australia 25th National Conference   Check publisher's open access policy
Place of Publication Deakin, A.C.T.
Publisher Blackwell Publishing for the Dietitians Association of Australia
Publication Year 2007
Sub-type Published abstract
DOI 10.1111/j.1747-0080.2007.00166.x
ISSN 1446-6368
1747-0080
Editor Malcolm Riley
Volume 64
Issue Supplement 1
Start page S34
End page S34
Total pages 1
Language eng
Abstract/Summary We investigated the interaction between dietary quality and television viewing time with abnormal glucose metabolism (AGM; impaired fasting glucose, impaired glucose tolerance or newly diagnosed diabetes). Data were from a population-based cross-sectional study (AusDiab) including 4,754 men and 5,849 women ≥25 years without diagnosed diabetes. Diet was measured by food frequency questionnaire, scored using the Diet Quality Index-Revised, and categorised as high, medium or low. Television time was categorised as low (≤14 hours/week) or high (>14 hours/week). Logistic regression models adjusting for known confounding variables, including physical activity and waist circumference, were constructed separately for men and women. For men and women, the odds of having AGM was 1.32 (95% CI 1.03–1.64, p = 0.030) in those with low diet quality compared to those with high diet quality. The interaction between television viewing time and diet quality was significant only for women. In women, relative to those with low television time and high diet quality, the odds ratio of having AGM was 1.74 (95% CI 1.20–2.51, p = 0.004) in those with low television time and low diet quality, 1.40 (95% CI 1.07–1.84, p = 0.015) in those with high television time and moderate diet quality and 2.52 (95% CI 1.62–3.92, p < 0.001) in those with high television time and low diet quality. The odds ratios for low television time and moderate diet quality (1.11, 95% CI 0.79–1.54) and high television time and high diet quality (1.07, 95% CI 0.77–1.48) were not significant. High diet quality, together with reduced sedentary time, is important for reducing the risk of AGM.
Subjects 11 Medical and Health Sciences
Q-Index Code EX
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

 
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Created: Fri, 28 Mar 2008, 16:21:06 EST