Bordetella Pertussis PCR positivity, following onset of illness in chldren under 5 years of age

Palmer, C. M., McCall, B., Jarvinen, K. and Nissen, M. D. (2007) Bordetella Pertussis PCR positivity, following onset of illness in chldren under 5 years of age. Communicable Diseases Intelligence, 31 2: 202-204.

Author Palmer, C. M.
McCall, B.
Jarvinen, K.
Nissen, M. D.
Title Bordetella Pertussis PCR positivity, following onset of illness in chldren under 5 years of age
Journal name Communicable Diseases Intelligence   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0725-3141
Publication date 2007-06-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
Volume 31
Issue 2
Start page 202
End page 204
Total pages 3
Editor O'Neil, K.
Place of publication Canberra, Australia
Publisher Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing, Office of Health Protection, Surveillance Branch
Collection year 2008
Language eng
Subject C1
730101 Infectious diseases
730204 Child health
270303 Virology
270304 Infectious Agents
Abstract Bordetella pertussis is a significant cause of respiratory illness and an ongoing public health problem. Pertussis polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing has been widely utilised since 2001, especially in infants. Uncertainty exists as to how long PCR remains positive following symptom onset. Further information on the time frame for pertussis PCR testing would assist diagnosis, epidemiological research and disease control. The Brisbane Southside Population Health Unit (BSPHU) conducted a retrospective analysis of enhanced surveillance data from pertussis notifications between January 2001 and December 2005, in children less than 5 years of age, in the BSPHU reporting area with the aim to determine the possible range of duration of Bordetella pertussis PCR, from symptom onset for this age group .. Of 1,826 pertussis notifications to BSPHU between January 2001 and December 2005, 155 (8.5%) were children under 5 years of age, with 1 15 pertussis PCR positive results. Analysis indicated a range of PCR positivity from day one to day 31 from the onset of catarrhal symptoms with most (84%) being within 21 days from onset of catarrah I symptoms. The range of PCR positivity following onset of paroxysmal cough was from day one to day 38 with most (89%) being within 14 days from the onset of paroxysmal cough. This review of pertussis PCR data in young children showed that PCR positive results generally mirrored the understood length of infectivity with regard to both catarrhal symptoms and paroxysmal cough; namely that PCR positive results were obtained at least 21 days following onset of catarrhal symptoms and at least 14 days following onset of paroxysmal cough. Commun Dis Intel! 2007;31 :202-205.
Formatted abstract
Bordetella pertussis is a significant cause of respiratory illness and an ongoing public health problem. Pertussis polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing has been widely utilised since 2001, especially in infants. Uncertainty exists as to how long PCR remains positive following symptom onset. Further information on the time frame for pertussis PCR testing would assist diagnosis, epidemiological research and disease control. The Brisbane Southside Population Health Unit (BSPHU) conducted a retrospective analysis of enhanced surveillance data from pertussis notifications between January 2001 and December 2005, in children less than 5 years of age, in the BSPHU reporting area with the aim to determine the possible range of duration of Bordetella pertussis PCR, from symptom onset for this age group .. Of 1,826 pertussis notifications to BSPHU between January 2001 and December 2005, 155 (8.5%) were children under 5 years of age, with 1 15 pertussis PCR positive results. Analysis indicated a range of PCR positivity from day one to day 31 from the onset of catarrhal symptoms with most (84%) being within 21 days from onset of catarrah I symptoms. The range of PCR positivity following onset of paroxysmal cough was from day one to day 38 with most (89%) being within 14 days from the onset of paroxysmal cough. This review of pertussis PCR data in young children showed that PCR positive results generally mirrored the understood length of infectivity with regard to both catarrhal symptoms and paroxysmal cough; namely that PCR positive results were obtained at least 21 days following onset of catarrhal symptoms and at least 14 days following onset of paroxysmal cough. Commun Dis Intel! 2007;31 :202-205.
Keyword Bordetella pertussis
Disease Management
epidemiology
Laboratory testing
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ
Additional Notes Erratum published in Communicable Disease Intelligence 2007;31:448

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2008 Higher Education Research Data Collection
Clinical Medical Virology Centre Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 20 Mar 2008, 00:45:23 EST by Lesley Arnicar on behalf of Clinical Medical Virology Centre