Speech recognition in noise for cochlear implant listeners: Benefits of residual hearing

Turner, Christopher W., Gantz, Bruce J., Videl, Corina, Behrens, Amy and Henry, Belinda A. (2004) Speech recognition in noise for cochlear implant listeners: Benefits of residual hearing. The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 115 4: 1729-1735. doi:10.1121/1.1687425

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Author Turner, Christopher W.
Gantz, Bruce J.
Videl, Corina
Behrens, Amy
Henry, Belinda A.
Title Speech recognition in noise for cochlear implant listeners: Benefits of residual hearing
Journal name The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0001-4966
1520-8524
Publication date 2004-04-01
Year available 2004
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1121/1.1687425
Open Access Status File (Publisher version)
Volume 115
Issue 4
Start page 1729
End page 1735
Total pages 7
Place of publication Melville, NY, United States
Publisher A I P Publishing LLC
Language eng
Subject 320705 Sensory Systems
321025 Rehabilitation and Therapy - Hearing and Speech
380302 Linguistic Processes (incl. Speech Production and Comprehension)
Abstract The purpose of this study was to explore the potential advantages, both theoretical and applied, of preserving low-frequency acoustic hearing in cochlear implant patients. Several hypotheses are presented that predict that residual low-frequency acoustic hearing along with electric stimulation for high frequencies will provide an advantage over traditional long-electrode cochlear implants for the recognition of speech in competing backgrounds. A simulation experiment in normal-hearing subjects demonstrated a clear advantage for preserving low-frequency residual acoustic hearing for speech recognition in a background of other talkers, but not in steady noise. Three subjects with an implanted "short-electrode" cochlear implant and preserved low-frequency acoustic hearing were also tested on speech recognition in the same competing backgrounds and compared to a larger group of traditional cochlear implant users. Each of the three short-electrode subjects performed better than any of the traditional long-electrode implant subjects for speech recognition in a background of other talkers, but not in steady noise, in general agreement with the simulation studies. When compared to a subgroup of traditional implant users matched according to speech recognition ability in quiet, the short-electrode patients showed a 9-dB advantage in the multitalker background. These experiments provide strong preliminary support for retaining residual low-frequency acoustic hearing in cochlear implant patients. The results are consistent with the idea that better perception of voice pitch, which can aid in separating voices in a background of other talkers, was responsible for this advantage.
Keyword Acoustic noise
Computer simulation
Electrodes
Implants (surgical)
Patient treatment
Q-Index Code C1
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 28 Mar 2007, 07:20:55 EST by Kathleen Reinhardt on behalf of Faculty Of Health Sciences