Airflow Patterns in Both Sides of a Realistic Human Nasal Cavity for Laminar and Turbulent Conditions

Wen, J., Inthavong, K., Tian, Z. F., Tu, J. Y., Xue, C. L. and Li, C. G. (2007). Airflow Patterns in Both Sides of a Realistic Human Nasal Cavity for Laminar and Turbulent Conditions. In: Peter Jacobs, Tim McIntyre, Matthew Cleary, David Buttsworth, David Mee, Rose Clements, Richard Morgan and Charles Lemckert, 16th Australasian Fluid Mechanics Conference (AFMC). 16th Australasian Fluid Mechanics Conference (AFMC), Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia, (68-74). 3-7 December, 2007.

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Author Wen, J.
Inthavong, K.
Tian, Z. F.
Tu, J. Y.
Xue, C. L.
Li, C. G.
Title of paper Airflow Patterns in Both Sides of a Realistic Human Nasal Cavity for Laminar and Turbulent Conditions
Conference name 16th Australasian Fluid Mechanics Conference (AFMC)
Conference location Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia
Conference dates 3-7 December, 2007
Proceedings title 16th Australasian Fluid Mechanics Conference (AFMC)
Place of Publication Brisbane, Australia
Publisher School of Engineering, The University of Queensland
Publication Year 2007
Year available 2007
Sub-type Fully published paper
ISBN 978-1-864998-94-8
Editor Peter Jacobs
Tim McIntyre
Matthew Cleary
David Buttsworth
David Mee
Rose Clements
Richard Morgan
Charles Lemckert
Start page 68
End page 74
Total pages 7
Collection year 2007
Language eng
Abstract/Summary Detailed data of air flow patterns can assist in the understanding of the physiological and pathological aspects of nasal breathing as well as the prediction of gas-particle flows. A computational model of a human nasal cavity was constructed from CT scans and air flow rates of 7.5L/min and 40L/min were simulated. The study obtained air flow patterns and its features such as pressure drop and airflow distribution and profiles for the left and right nasal cavities. The results were compared with each other while some results were compared with experimental and numerical data that were available. The flow patterns in the nasal valve and turbinate were studied in particular detail, since the airflow profiles in these regions have not been well investigated. Maximum velocities were found at the narrowest cross-sections at the nasal valve region. The airflow distribution showed airflow remaining close to the nasal septum wall and little flow reached the outer meatus regions. The role of the turbinates with respect to the airflow distribution and the possible health implications on the differences in the left and right cavities was briefly discussed.
Subjects 290000 Engineering and Technology
Keyword nasal breathing
air flow patterns
gas-particle flows
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: 16th Australasian Fluid Mechanics Conference
 
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Created: Fri, 14 Mar 2008, 08:12:12 EST by Thelma Whitbourne on behalf of School of Engineering