The synthesis of road vehicle vibrations based on the statistical distribution of segment lengths

Rouillard, Vincent (2007). The synthesis of road vehicle vibrations based on the statistical distribution of segment lengths. In: Martin Veidt, Faris Albermani, Bill Daniel, John Griffiths, Doug Hargreaves, Ross McAree, Paul Meehan and Andy Tan, Proceedings of the 5th Australasian Congress on Applied Mechanics (ACAM 2007). 5th Australasian Congress on Applied Mechanics (ACAM 2007), Brisbane, Australia, (614-619). 10-12 December, 2007.

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Author Rouillard, Vincent
Title of paper The synthesis of road vehicle vibrations based on the statistical distribution of segment lengths
Conference name 5th Australasian Congress on Applied Mechanics (ACAM 2007)
Conference location Brisbane, Australia
Conference dates 10-12 December, 2007
Proceedings title Proceedings of the 5th Australasian Congress on Applied Mechanics (ACAM 2007)
Place of Publication Brisbane
Publisher Engineers Australia
Publication Year 2007
Year available 2008
Sub-type Fully published paper
ISBN 0 8582 5862 5
Editor Martin Veidt
Faris Albermani
Bill Daniel
John Griffiths
Doug Hargreaves
Ross McAree
Paul Meehan
Andy Tan
Volume 1
Start page 614
End page 619
Total pages 6
Collection year 2007
Language eng
Abstract/Summary This paper presents the development of a method for synthesizing non-stationary random vibrations generated by road transport vehicles. The paper builds upon the observation that nonstationary random vehicle vibrations are composed of a sequence of zero-mean random Gaussian processes of varying standard deviations. It shows how a change-point detection algorithm can be applied to the instantaneous magnitude of sample vibration records to identify the length of stationary segments within the record. The statistical distribution of the segment lengths is characterised with a hyperbolic trigonometric function. The paper shows how the segment length distribution model is used to form a sophisticated control strategy for synthesising non-stationary random vibrations. The paper explains how the new control system is incorporated into a standard random vibration simulation system and presents results which validate the effectiveness of the method.
Subjects 290501 Mechanical Engineering
Keyword Non-Gaussian
nonstationarities
random vibrations
simulation
synthesis
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

 
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Created: Thu, 13 Mar 2008, 12:06:03 EST by Laura McTaggart on behalf of School of Engineering