Observation and Analysis of Surface Acoustic Wave Induced Atomization

Friend, James and Yeo, Leslie (2007). Observation and Analysis of Surface Acoustic Wave Induced Atomization. In: Martin Veidt, Faris Albermani, Bill Daniel, John Griffiths, Doug Hargreaves, Ross McAree, Paul Meehan and Andy Tan, Proceedings of the 5th Australasian Congress on Applied Mechanics (ACAM 2007). 5th Australasian Congress on Applied Mechanics (ACAM 2007), Brisbane, Australia, (432-434). 10-12 December, 2007.

Attached Files (Some files may be inaccessible until you login with your UQ eSpace credentials)
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
C3.2.pdf Session C3.2: Surface Acoustic Wave: Friend papers application/pdf 125.37KB 537
Author Friend, James
Yeo, Leslie
Title of paper Observation and Analysis of Surface Acoustic Wave Induced Atomization
Conference name 5th Australasian Congress on Applied Mechanics (ACAM 2007)
Conference location Brisbane, Australia
Conference dates 10-12 December, 2007
Proceedings title Proceedings of the 5th Australasian Congress on Applied Mechanics (ACAM 2007)
Place of Publication Brisbane
Publisher Engineers Australia
Publication Year 2007
Year available 2008
Sub-type Fully published paper
ISBN 0 8582 5862 5
Editor Martin Veidt
Faris Albermani
Bill Daniel
John Griffiths
Doug Hargreaves
Ross McAree
Paul Meehan
Andy Tan
Volume 1
Start page 432
End page 434
Total pages 3
Collection year 2007
Language eng
Abstract/Summary The ability to excite instabilities in free fluid surfaces via acoustic excitation is well known, even to the point of atomization. Surprisingly, atomization phenomena exist at frequencies up to 1 GHz, because peak piezoelectrically-driven vibration velocities remain remarkably constant at about 1 m/s regardless of the excitation frequency if one makes use of different materials and vibration modes along the way. At 100 MHz, for example, we have maintained surface acoustic waves 1 m/s vibration velocity and measured displacements and accelerations of 10 nanometers and 10 million m/s2. At these extreme conditions, fluid microfilaments, multiscale droplet formation, and other curious phenomena appear. Understanding the behaviour is important for applications in rheology and the study of solid-fluid interactions on the micro and nanoscale, and we illustrate methods for observation of the atomization and vibration conduction processes under these conditions.
Subjects 290501 Mechanical Engineering
Keyword surface acoustic waves
atomization
structure-fluid interaction
piezoelectricity
Rayleigh waves
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Wed, 12 Mar 2008, 15:19:05 EST by Laura McTaggart on behalf of School of Engineering