The social vocalization repertoire of east Australian migrating humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae)

Dunlop, Rebecca A., Noad, Michael J., Cato, Douglas H. and Stokes, Dale (2007) The social vocalization repertoire of east Australian migrating humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae). The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 122 5: 2893-2905. doi:10.1121/1.2783115

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Author Dunlop, Rebecca A.
Noad, Michael J.
Cato, Douglas H.
Stokes, Dale
Title The social vocalization repertoire of east Australian migrating humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae)
Formatted title
The social vocalization repertoire of east Australian migrating humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae)
Journal name The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0001-4966
1520-8524
Publication date 2007-11
Year available 2007
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1121/1.2783115
Open Access Status File (Publisher version)
Volume 122
Issue 5
Start page 2893
End page 2905
Total pages 13
Place of publication Melville, NY, United States
Publisher A I P Publishing LLC
Collection year 2008
Language eng
Subject C1
240501 Acoustics and Acoustical Devices; Waves
270702 Marine and Estuarine Ecology (incl. Marine Ichthyology)
300599 Veterinary Sciences not elsewhere classified
770499 Other
780105 Biological sciences
Abstract Although the songs of humpback whales have been extensively studied, other vocalizations and percussive sounds, referred to as "social sounds," have received little attention. This study presents the social vocalization repertoire of migrating east Australian humpback whales from a sample of 660 sounds recorded from 61 groups of varying composition, over three years. The social vocalization repertoire of humpback whales was much larger than previously described with a total of 34 separate call types classified aurally and by spectrographic analysis as well as statistically. Of these, 21 call types were the same as units of the song current at the time of recording but used individually instead of as part of the song sequence, while the other 13 calls were stable over the three years of the study and were not part of the song. This study provides a catalog of sounds that can be used as a basis for future studies. It is an essential first step in determining the function, contextual use and cultural transmission of humpback social vocalizations. (c) 2007 Acoustical Society of America.
Keyword Acoustics
Acoustic Repertoire
Sounds
Songs
Playback
Behavior
Q-Index Code C1
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
School of Veterinary Science Publications
 
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Created: Mon, 10 Mar 2008, 12:52:26 EST by Maria Malgapo on behalf of School of Veterinary Science