The efficacy of an augmented virtual reality system to alleviate pain in children undergoing burns dressing changes: randomised controlled trial

Mott, Jonathan, Bucolo, Sam, Cuttle, Leila, Mill, Julie, Hilder, Melanie, Miller, Kate and Kimble, Roy M. (2008) The efficacy of an augmented virtual reality system to alleviate pain in children undergoing burns dressing changes: randomised controlled trial. Burns, 34 6: 803-808. doi:10.1016/j.burns.2007.10.010


Author Mott, Jonathan
Bucolo, Sam
Cuttle, Leila
Mill, Julie
Hilder, Melanie
Miller, Kate
Kimble, Roy M.
Title The efficacy of an augmented virtual reality system to alleviate pain in children undergoing burns dressing changes: randomised controlled trial
Journal name Burns   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0305-4179
Publication date 2008
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.burns.2007.10.010
Volume 34
Issue 6
Start page 803
End page 808
Total pages 6
Place of publication Oxford, England
Publisher Elsevier Science Direct
Collection year 2009
Language eng
Subject 320705 Sensory Systems
C1
730204 Child health
730117 Skin and related disorders
320503 Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics
Abstract Abstract In children, the pain and anxiety associated with acute burn dressing changes can be severe, with drug treatment alone frequently proving to be inadequate. Virtual reality (VR) systems have been successfully trialled in limited numbers of adult and paediatric burn patients. Augmented reality (AR) differs from VR in that it overlays virtual images onto the physical world, instead of creating a complete virtual world. This prospective randomised controlled trial investigated the use of AR as an adjunct to analgesia and sedation in children with acute burns. Forty-two children (30 male and 12 female), with an age range of 3–14 years (median age 9 years) and a total burn surface area ranging from 1 to 16% were randomised into a treatment (AR) arm and a control (basic cognitive therapy) arm after administration of analgesia and/or sedation. Pain scores, pulse rates (PR), respiratory rates (RR) and oxygen saturations (SaO2) were recorded pre-procedurally, at 10 min intervals and post-procedurally. Parents were also asked to grade their child's overall pain score for the dressing change. Mean pain scores were significantly lower (p = 0.0060) in the AR group compared to the control group, as were parental pain assessment scores (p = 0.015). Respiratory and pulse rates showed significant changes over time within groups, however, these were not significantly different between the two study groups. Oxygen saturation did not differ significantly over time or between the two study groups. This trial shows that augmented reality is a useful adjunct to pharmacological analgesia.
Keyword Augmented Reality
Virtual Reality
Chld Burns
Randomised
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2009 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Medicine Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 31 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 34 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Wed, 05 Mar 2008, 16:43:54 EST