The effects of dietary protein on bone mineral mass in young adults may be modulated by adolescent calcium intake

Vatanparast, Hassanali, Bailey, Donald A., Baxter-Jones, Adam D. G. and Whiting, Susan J. (2007) The effects of dietary protein on bone mineral mass in young adults may be modulated by adolescent calcium intake. Journal of Nutrition, 137 12: 2674-2679.


Author Vatanparast, Hassanali
Bailey, Donald A.
Baxter-Jones, Adam D. G.
Whiting, Susan J.
Title The effects of dietary protein on bone mineral mass in young adults may be modulated by adolescent calcium intake
Journal name Journal of Nutrition   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0022-3166
Publication date 2007-12-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
Volume 137
Issue 12
Start page 2674
End page 2679
Total pages 6
Editor A. C. Ross
Place of publication Bethesda, M.D., U.S.A.
Publisher American Society for Nutritional Science
Collection year 2008
Language eng
Subject 321205 Nutrition and Dietetics
730114 Skeletal system and disorders (incl. arthritis)
730215 Nutrition
C1
Abstract The effect of dietary protein on bone mass measures at different life stages is controversial. We investigated the influence of protein intake on bone mass measures in young adults, considering the influence of calcium intake through adolescence. Subjects were 133 young adults (59 males, 74 females) who were participating in the Saskatchewan Pediatric Bone Mineral Accrual Study (1991-1997, 2003-2006). At adulthood, their mean age was 23 y. We assessed dietary intake via serial 24-h recalls carried out at least once yearly. Total body (TB) bone mineral content (BMC) and TB bone mineral density (BMD) were assessed annually using Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. We determined TB-BMC net gain from the age of peak height velocity (PHV) to early adulthood. We analyzed data from all subjects and subsets based on sex and calcium intake using multiple regression. TB-BMC significantly increased from age at PHV to early adulthood by 41 % in males and 37% in females. Height, weight, physical activity, and sex were significant predictors of TB-BMC, TB-BMC net gain, and TB-BMD among all subjects. Protein intake predicted TB-BMC net gain in all subjects (beta = 0.11; P = 0.015). In females at peri-adolescence or early adulthood with adequate calcium intake (>1 000 mg/d), protein intake positively predicted TB-BMC, TB-BMC net gain, and TB-BMD (P < 0.05). Our results indicate that when calcium intake is adequate, protein intake has a beneficial effect on the bone mass of young adult females. Protein, in the absence of sufficient calcium, does not confer as much benefit to bone.
Keyword Nutrition & Dietetics
Renal Acid Load
Hip Fracture
Conditioning Program
Postmenopausal Women
Vegetable Protein
Healthy-children
Elderly-women
Femoral-neck
Density
Consumption
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code

 
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Created: Tue, 19 Feb 2008, 01:40:50 EST