Respiratory properties of blood in flatback turtles (Natator depressus)

Sperling, J. B., Grigg, G. C., Beard, L. A. and Limpus, C. J. (2007) Respiratory properties of blood in flatback turtles (Natator depressus). Journal of Comparative Physiology B-Biochemical Systemic And Environmental Physiology, 177 7: 779-786.


Author Sperling, J. B.
Grigg, G. C.
Beard, L. A.
Limpus, C. J.
Title Respiratory properties of blood in flatback turtles (Natator depressus)
Formatted title Respiratory properties of blood in flatback turtles (Natator depressus)
Journal name Journal of Comparative Physiology B-Biochemical Systemic And Environmental Physiology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0174-1578
Publication date 2007
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s00360-007-0174-3
Volume 177
Issue 7
Start page 779
End page 786
Total pages 8
Editor Heldmaier, G.
Place of publication Heidelberg
Publisher Springer Heidelberg
Collection year 2008
Language eng
Subject C1
270603 Animal Physiology - Systems
780105 Biological sciences
Abstract Oxygen equilibrium curves and other respiratory-related variables were determined on blood from the flatback turtle (Natator depressus) and, for comparison, on some samples from the loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta). The oxygen carrying capacity of the flatback turtle, 4.9-8.7 mmol l(-1) (n = 49), is at the high end of the range in diving reptiles. Oxygen affinity (P-50) was similar in both species at 5% CO2, ranging from 37 to 55 mmHg (43 mmHg +/- 5.3 SD, n = 24, 25 degrees C, pH 7.17) in flatbacks and 43-49 mmHg in loggerheads (46 mmHg +/- 2.0 SD, n = 7, 25 degrees C, pH 7.13), whereas at 2% CO2, flatbacks had a higher oxygen affinity. The curves differed in sigmoidicity, with Hill n coefficients of 2.8 and 1.9 in flatbacks and loggerheads, respectively. The Bohr effect was small in both the species, consistent with results from other sea turtles. Lactate levels were high, perhaps because the samples were taken from turtles coming ashore to lay eggs. Flatbacks are rarely found in waters deeper than 45 m. It is suggested that they have a respiratory physiology particularly suited to sustain prolonged shallow dives.
Keyword Physiology
Zoology
sea turtles
diving physiology
Bohr effect
oxygen equilibrium curve
oxygen carrying capacity
Leatherback Sea-turtle
Northern Prawn Fishery
Fresh-water Turtle
Oxygen-affinity
Dermochelys-coriacea
Caretta-caretta
Chelonia-mydas
Lepidochelys-kempi
Incidental Capture
Diving Behavior
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code

 
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Created: Mon, 18 Feb 2008, 15:07:27 EST