Objectively measured sedentary time and light-intensity physical activity are independently associated with components of the metabolic syndrome: The AusDiab study

Healy, G. N., Dunstan, D. W., Shaw, J. E., Zimmet, P. Z. and Owen, N. (2007). Objectively measured sedentary time and light-intensity physical activity are independently associated with components of the metabolic syndrome: The AusDiab study. In: E. Gale, Diabetologia. Abstracts. 42nd EASD Annual Meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes, Copenhagen, Denmark, (S67-S68). 18-21 September 2006. doi:10.1007/s00125-007-0809-7


Author Healy, G. N.
Dunstan, D. W.
Shaw, J. E.
Zimmet, P. Z.
Owen, N.
Title of paper Objectively measured sedentary time and light-intensity physical activity are independently associated with components of the metabolic syndrome: The AusDiab study
Conference name 42nd EASD Annual Meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes
Conference location Copenhagen, Denmark
Conference dates 18-21 September 2006
Proceedings title Diabetologia. Abstracts   Check publisher's open access policy
Journal name Diabetologia   Check publisher's open access policy
Place of Publication Berlin; Heidelberg, Germany
Publisher Springer Verlag
Publication Year 2007
DOI 10.1007/s00125-007-0809-7
ISSN 0012-186X
1432-0428
Editor E. Gale
Volume 50
Issue Supplement 1
Start page S67
End page S68
Total pages 2
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
Background and Aims:
Physical activity and sedentary behaviour are key
modifiable risk factors for components of the metabolic syndrome. However,
studies typically have used physical activity variables derived from imprecise
self-report measures. We examined the associations of objectively-measured
sedentary time and light-intensity physical activity with components of the
metabolic syndrome in Australian adults without known diabetes.

Materials and Methods:

70 men and 108 women (mean age 53.4, range
30 to 87) were recruited from the 2004–2005 Australian Diabetes, Obesity,
and Lifestyle (AusDiab) study. Physical activity was measured by Actigraph
accelerometers worn during waking hours for seven consecutive days, and
divided into sedentary time (counts/minute <100), light-intensity (counts/
minute 100–1951), and moderate-to-vigorous intensity (counts/minute
>1952). An oral glucose tolerance test was used to obtain fasting and 2-hr
plasma glucose, serum-triglycerides, and HDL-C. Waist circumference and
blood pressure were measured at the testing site. Components of the metabolic
syndrome were dichotomised according to the current IDF definition, and
reported as central obesity, raised triglycerides, blood pressure, fasting plasma
glucose, and 2-hr plasma glucose, and reduced HDL-C.

Results:

In logistic regression analyses adjusted for age, sex, time accelerometer
worn, income, education, and moderate-to-vigorous intensity activity, each
additional hour/day of sedentary time was associated with an increased risk
of central obesity (OR=1.40, p=0.017); while each hour/day of light intensity
activity was associated with a reduced risk (OR=0.69, p=0.009). When waist
circumference (cm) was included in the model, each hour/day of sedentary
time was associated with an increased risk of raised triglycerides (OR=1.44,
p=0.046), raised 2-hr plasma glucose (OR=1.72, p=0.052), and reduced
HDL-C (OR=1.56, p=0.009); each hour/day of light-intensity activity was
associated with a significantly lower risk of raised triglycerides (OR=0.66,
p=0.028), raised 2-hr plasma glucose (OR=0.55, p=0.036), and reduced
HDL-C (OR=0.65, p=0.012). The associations of sedentary time and light-intensity
activity with raised blood pressure and fasting blood glucose were
not statistically significant (p>0.1).

Conclusion:

These findings provide some of the first evidence from objective
activity data that sedentary time is unfavourably associated with components
of the metabolic syndrome, particularly central obesity, triglycerides, 2-hr
plasma glucose, and HDL-C, and that light-intensity activity is beneficially
associated. Importantly, these associations were independent of moderateto-
vigorous intensity activity. The findings suggest that substituting lightintensity
activity for television viewing or other sedentary time may be a
practical and achievable strategy to improve metabolic risk in adults.
Supported by Queensland Government Growing the Smart State PhD fund,
NHMRC

Subjects 11 Medical and Health Sciences
1103 Clinical Sciences
Keyword Endocrinology
Metabolism
Diabetes
Sedentary time
Q-Index Code EX
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

 
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Created: Tue, 19 Feb 2008, 01:03:00 EST