A comprehensive analysis of the biogeography of the thelastomatoid pinworms from Australian burrowing cockroaches (Blaberidae : Geoscapheinae, Panesthiinae): no evidence of coevolution

Jex, A. R., Schneider, M. A., Rose, H. A. and Cribb, T. H. (2007) A comprehensive analysis of the biogeography of the thelastomatoid pinworms from Australian burrowing cockroaches (Blaberidae : Geoscapheinae, Panesthiinae): no evidence of coevolution. Parasitology, 134 10: 1387-1399.


Author Jex, A. R.
Schneider, M. A.
Rose, H. A.
Cribb, T. H.
Title A comprehensive analysis of the biogeography of the thelastomatoid pinworms from Australian burrowing cockroaches (Blaberidae : Geoscapheinae, Panesthiinae): no evidence of coevolution
Journal name Parasitology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0031-1820
Publication date 2007-04-24
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1017/S0031182007002843
Volume 134
Issue 10
Start page 1387
End page 1399
Total pages 13
Editor C. Arme
Place of publication New York
Publisher Cambridge Univ Press
Collection year 2008
Language eng
Subject 270501 Animal Systematics, Taxonomy and Phylogeny
270504 Invertebrate Biology
C1
780105 Biological sciences
Abstract We report 21 thelastomatoid species parasitizing 31 described and 5 undescribed geoscapheine and panesthiine cockroaches, representing all but 1 of the known species of these subfamilies in Australia. The nematodes have 3 distinct patterns of host distribution: dominant, moderate and rare. The 4 dominant species, Cordonicola gibsoni, Leidynemella fusiformis, Travassosinema jaidenae and Aoruroides queenslandensis, are highly prevalent, found in nearly all host species examined, and broadly distributed. The 8 moderate species have lower prevalences but are still widely distributed. Man), of these species are more common in one host subfamily than the other. The remaining 9 rare species have highly restricted host and geographical distributions. Six of the 21 species are exclusive to geoscapheines, 5 to panesthiines and 10 are shared. These patterns suggest that most of the reported thelastomatoid species are generalists rather than specialists, that host-specificity within this group is low and that co-evolutionary speciation has had little, if any, impact on structuring the thelastomatoid fauna of Australian burrowing cockroaches. In a broader context, this study provides the first comprehensive examination of the role of coevolutionary speciation and host specificity in regulating the distribution of pinworms in arthropods.
Keyword Parasitology
nematoda
oxyurida
thelastomatoidea
thelastomatidae
cockroaches
host-specificity
coevolution
biogeography
guild
distribution
Species Richness
Periplaneta-americana
Host-specificity
Population-size
Nematoda
Oxyurida
Parasites
Primates
Blattodea
Blattaria
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code

 
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Created: Mon, 18 Feb 2008, 14:57:58 EST