A Multi-Centre Prospective Case-Control Study of Campylobacter Infection in Persons Aged 5 Years and Older in Australia

Stafford, R. J., Schluter, P., Kirk, M., Wilson, A., Unicomb, L., Ashbolt, R. and Gregory, J. (2007) A Multi-Centre Prospective Case-Control Study of Campylobacter Infection in Persons Aged 5 Years and Older in Australia. Epidemiology and Infection, 135 6: 978-988.


Author Stafford, R. J.
Schluter, P.
Kirk, M.
Wilson, A.
Unicomb, L.
Ashbolt, R.
Gregory, J.
Title A Multi-Centre Prospective Case-Control Study of Campylobacter Infection in Persons Aged 5 Years and Older in Australia
Journal name Epidemiology and Infection   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0950-2688
1469-4409
Publication date 2007
Year available 2006
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1017/S0950268806007576
Volume 135
Issue 6
Start page 978
End page 988
Total pages 11
Editor N. Noah
Place of publication New York
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Collection year 2008
Language eng
Subject C1
321202 Epidemiology
730216 Food safety
Abstract There are an estimated 277 000 cases of campylobacteriosis in Australia each year, most of which are thought to be sporadically acquired. To explore causes for these infections, we conducted a multi-centre case-control study of patients and community controls across five Australian States during 2001-2002. A total of 881 campylobacter cases and 833 controls aged >= 5 years were recruited into the study. Crude logistic analyses were conducted within various food and non-food exposure groups. A final most parsimonious multivariable logistic regression model was developed and adjusted odds ratios (aOR), 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were derived together with adjusted population attributable risks (PAR). Consumption of undercooked chicken (aOR 4.7, 95% CI 2.6-8.4) and offal (aOR 2.0, 95% CI 1.0-4.0), ownership of domestic chickens aged < 6 months (aOR 12.4, 95% CI 2.6-59.3) and domestic dogs aged < 6 months (aOR 2.1, 95% CI 1.1-4.2) were found to be independent risk factors for illness in the final model. The PAR proportions indicate that eating chicken meat, either cooked or undercooked may account for approximately 30% of campylobacter cases that occur each year in Australia. These results justify the continued need for education of consumers and foodhandlers about the risks associated with the handling of raw chicken and the potential for cross-contamination.
Keyword Public, Environmental & Occupational Health
Infectious Diseases
Risk-factors
Young-children
Jejuni Infections
United-states
New-zealand
Raw
Contamination
Salmonella
Outbreaks
Chickens
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code

 
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