An assessment of the genetic relationship between sweet and grain sorghums, within Sorghum bicolor ssp bicolor (L.) Moench, using AFLP markers

Ritter, KB, McIntyre, CL, Godwin, ID, Jordan, DR and Chapman, SC (2007) An assessment of the genetic relationship between sweet and grain sorghums, within Sorghum bicolor ssp bicolor (L.) Moench, using AFLP markers. Euphytica, 157 1-2: 161-176.


Author Ritter, KB
McIntyre, CL
Godwin, ID
Jordan, DR
Chapman, SC
Title An assessment of the genetic relationship between sweet and grain sorghums, within Sorghum bicolor ssp bicolor (L.) Moench, using AFLP markers
Formatted title An assessment of the genetic relationship between sweet and grain sorghums, within Sorghum bicolor ssp bicolor (L.) Moench, using AFLP markers
Journal name Euphytica   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0014-2336
Publication date 2007
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s10681-007-9408-4
Volume 157
Issue 1-2
Start page 161
End page 176
Total pages 16
Place of publication Netherlands
Publisher Kluwer
Language eng
Subject 300203 Plant Improvement (Selection, Breeding and Genetic Engineering)
620104 Other cereals
070305 Crop and Pasture Improvement (Selection and Breeding)
Formatted abstract Compared to grain sorghums, sweet sorghums typically have lower grain yield and thick, tall stalks which accumulate high levels of sugar (sucrose, fructose and glucose). Unlike commercial grain sorghum (S. bicolor ssp. bicolor) cultivars, which are usually F-1 hybrids, commercial sweet sorghums were selected as wild accessions or have undergone limited plant breeding. Although all sweet sorghums are classified within S. bicolor ssp. bicolor, their genetic relationship with grain sorghums is yet to be investigated. Ninety-five genotypes, including 31 sweet sorghums and 64 grain sorghums, representing all five races within the subspecies bicolor, were screened with 277 polymorphic amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers. Cluster analysis separated older sweet sorghum accessions (collected in mid 1800s) from those developed and released during the early to mid 1900s. These groups were emphasised in a principle component analysis of the results such that sweet sorghum lines were largely distinguished from the others, particularly by a group of markers located on sorghum chromosomes SBI-08 and SBI-10. Other studies have shown that QTL and ESTs for sugar-related traits, as well as for height and anthesis, map to SBI-10. Although the clusters obtained did not group clearly on the basis of racial classification, the sweet sorghum lines often cluster with grain sorghums of similar racial origin thus suggesting that sweet sorghum is of polyphyletic origin within S. bicolor ssp. bicolor.
Keyword Agronomy
Plant Sciences
Horticulture
AFLP
genetic diversity
grain sorghum
Sorghum bicolor
sweet sorghum
Cultivated Sorghum
Diversity
Identification
Accessions
Qtls
Rapd
Q-Index Code C1

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
School of Agriculture and Food Sciences
 
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