Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and the burden of stroke

Thrift, Amanda G. and Hayman, Noel (2007) Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and the burden of stroke. International Journal of Stroke, 2 1: 57-59.


Author Thrift, Amanda G.
Hayman, Noel
Title Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and the burden of stroke
Journal name International Journal of Stroke   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1747-4930
1747-4949
Publication date 2007-02
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1747-4949.2007.00090.x
Volume 2
Issue 1
Start page 57
End page 59
Total pages 3
Place of publication Richmond, VIC, Australia
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Asia
Language eng
Subject 11 Medical and Health Sciences
Abstract Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples comprise about 2.4% of the Australian population. There is little information about stroke among these groups of people. Most information comes from national mortality and hospital morbidity data, and population-based surveys of risk factors. Hospitalisations for stroke among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples are 1-2-fold that of non-indigenous males and 1.9-fold that of non-indigenous females. Similarly, deaths from stroke are greater among Indigenous Australians, being approximately double that of non-Indigenous Australians. The disparity in stroke deaths is greatest among younger individuals. Differences in hospitalisations and mortality from stroke can be attributed to both a greater prevalence of modifiable risk factors for stroke among the Indigenous population and poorer access to acute care services. Access to appropriate primary health care is also problematic for many Indigenous Australians, mainly because of their distance from health services and lack of available transport. Stroke and its risk factors are common among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. Adopting national and state strategy actions, such as providing a comprehensive primary health care program and increased training and support for health care providers, is urgently needed to reduce the incidence of stroke in these groups. However, continued efforts across the health care sector are required to ensure stroke reduction in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.
Q-Index Code C1
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
School of Medicine Publications
 
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Created: Mon, 18 Feb 2008, 17:28:26 EST