Awareness typologies, long-term emotional adjustment and psychosocial outcomes following acquired brain injury

Ownsworth, Tamara, Fleming, Jenny, Strong, Jenny, Radel, Michael, Chan, Wilbur and Clare, Linda (2007) Awareness typologies, long-term emotional adjustment and psychosocial outcomes following acquired brain injury. Neuropsychological Rehabilitation, 17 2: 129-150. doi:10.1080/09602010600615506


Author Ownsworth, Tamara
Fleming, Jenny
Strong, Jenny
Radel, Michael
Chan, Wilbur
Clare, Linda
Title Awareness typologies, long-term emotional adjustment and psychosocial outcomes following acquired brain injury
Journal name Neuropsychological Rehabilitation   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1464-0694
0960-2011
Publication date 2007
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/09602010600615506
Volume 17
Issue 2
Start page 129
End page 150
Total pages 22
Place of publication Hove, England
Publisher Psychology Press
Collection year 2008
Language eng
Subject 321013 Neurology and Neuromuscular Diseases
C1
730303 Occupational, speech and physiotherapy
Abstract Previous research suggests considerable heterogeneity within groups of individuals identified as having low self-awareness or good self-awareness following acquired brain injury (ABI). The present study aimed to identify typologies of individuals according to neuropsychological and psychological factors related to awareness deficits and compare emotional adjustment and psychosocial outcomes at the initial assessment and 12-month follow-up. Eighty-four participants with ABI (mean time since injury 3.9 years) were assessed on the Self-Awareness of Deficits Interview, Awareness Questionnaire, Symptom Expectancy Checklist, Marlowe-Crowne Social Desirability Scale, Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale, Sydney Psychosocial Reintegration Scale, and an error self-regulation index. A 12-month follow-up assessment of emotional adjustment and psychosocial outcomes was conducted. A hierarchical cluster analysis distinguished four awareness typologies, namely, "poor self-awareness" (n = 12), "high defensiveness" (n = 13), "high symptom reporting" (n = 15), and "good self-awareness" (n = 44). An overall comparison of outcomes indicated that the poor self-awareness and high symptom reporting typologies experienced poorer outcomes than the high defensiveness and good self-awareness typologies. The findings confirm that there are different awareness typologies and highlight the need to tailor interventions according to the nature of awareness deficits.
Keyword Neurosciences
Psychology
Closed-head Injury
Self-awareness
Impaired Awareness
Executive Function
Deficits
Rehabilitation
Anosognosia
Unawareness
Scale
Questionnaire
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code

 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 36 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 42 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Mon, 18 Feb 2008, 17:08:39 EST